Articles filed under Impact on Economy

Dominion encouraged by new bids for offshore wind turbines, but no decision yet

A second round of bids to build two wind turbines off the Virginia Beach coast appears to have lowered the price, but Dominion Virginia Power officials haven’t decided yet whether to green-light the demonstration project. “We are optimistic, but it is a fairly hefty cost to deploy these turbines,” Mark Mitchell, a Dominion vice president, said in an interview Wednesday.
8 Apr 2016

Clarkson study: Henderson could lose $40 million in property value from Galloo Island wind project

Because Henderson wouldn’t receive any tax benefits from the wind project, its impact would be largely negative — especially for the value of waterfront properties. The analysis of property values in Henderson was based on a review of the impacts of the Wolfe Island Wind Farm on properties in Jefferson County, ...Based on the sale of 26 properties in Jefferson County with a view of the turbines on Wolfe Island, the analysis found that the value of the properties depreciated by about 15 percent after the wind farm became operational in 2009.
5 Apr 2016

Energy poverty rising in Canada

“The high incidence of energy poverty in Canada, particularly when gasoline expenditures are included, should be of central concern when policies regarding energy are devised. Policies that raise prices could exacerbate problems faced by families who are in energy poverty, or those on the cusp of energy poverty.”
15 Mar 2016

Is Deepwater Wind's Block Island project worth the cost to ratepayers?

Ratepayers are expected to pay an above-market price of $440 million for Deepwater’s energy over the next two decades, according to a 2015 filing with the state Public Utilities Commission. Critics say total tab will be more than $500 million, due to added costs, like laying the cable linking Block Island to the mainland. This cost sparked the filing of a federal lawsuit last year that attempts to undo the contract between the utility company National Grid and Deepwater Wind.
23 Feb 2016

Recent hydro bills 'shocking' for some

The origins of the current situation can be traced back to former Liberal leader and then-Premier Dalton McGuinty signing “enormous, outrageous renewable energy contracts.” ...over the next 20 years the wind turbine projects that are already built, as well as the projects on the books, will cost $60-billion and are only producing 4% of Ontario's overall electricity needs.
6 Feb 2016

Denmark, a green energy leader, slows pace of its spending

“I think the criticism is over the top,” Lars Christian Lilleholt, Denmark’s energy minister, told the Politiken newspaper last month. He said the country still planned to invest 800 million krone, or $114 million, in green energy research in the coming year. “There is less money, but it is still a lot. And I sit in a government that must find a way for the Danish economy to make ends meet.”
6 Dec 2015

Ontario Hydro customers paid billions extra because Liberals ignored their own energy plans: AG

The auditor found the Green Energy Act is also driving up rates. Hydro customers will pay a total of $9.2 billion more for wind and solar projects under the Liberals’ 20-year guaranteed-price program for renewable energy than they would have paid under the old program. Ontario’s guaranteed prices for wind power generators are double the U.S. average, while the province’s solar power rates are three-and-a-half times higher.
3 Dec 2015

Telling the truth about Vermont's energy policy

The vast building and subsidizing of renewable energy facilities throughout Vermont will not affect climate change. ...By following these policies we will not pass on to the next generation a Vermont that is one iota cooler or more stable than it otherwise would be. It will be, however, uglier, less accessible, more expensive, and harder to find a job. Talk about a call to burn down the village in order to save it!
19 Nov 2015

Make it cheaper to go green

Consider Germany. It has committed to pay more than $110 billion in solar subsidies over the next 20 years, even though solar contributes only one percent of primary energy consumption. The net effect of these solar panels for the climate will be to delay global warming by a mere 37 hours by the end of the century. Globally, we will spend $2.5 trillion on subsidies for wind and solar over the next 25 years — and they will still need subsidizing, according to the IEA.
18 Nov 2015

$30 billion estimate burdens consumers, NextEra critics say

Eric Gleason, president of NextEra Energy Hawaii LLC, said at a Waikiki business luncheon this week that getting the state off its dependence on oil would cost $30 billion over the next three decades. ...divided among Hawaiian Electric's 455,000 ratepayers on Oahu, Maui and Hawaii island, each customer would pay an additional $183 per month for 30 years.
11 Nov 2015

British Steel’s Green Death

Start with a suite of renewable-energy policies that keep ratcheting up electricity costs. The so-called renewables obligation, which requires utilities to buy a steadily increasing share of their power from trendy green sources such as solar and wind, is driving up wholesale power prices. So is the feed-in tariff, which forces utilities to pay a minimum rate for renewable electricity that’s higher than the cost of fossil-fuel-fired generation.
7 Oct 2015

Feel-good energy policy

Maybe, just maybe, some Mainers are becoming less inclined to fall in line and accept the state’s excessively generous standards for wind development. The Fort Fairfield Town Council recently approved a wind ordinance requiring turbine siting of one mile from property lines of non-participating property owners, rather than acceding to the state model — written by the wind industry — requiring setback of only 150 percent of the height of the turbine.
3 Oct 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=3&topic=Impact+on+Economy&type=Article
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