Library filed under Safety

Enniskillen eyes fire suppression bylaw for wind turbines

Mayor Kevin Marriott recently presented three bylaws from communities in Grey and Huron Counties, which require wind energy companies to install fire suppression units in the motor of the industrial turbines. There motors, in some cases, are up to 300 feet off the ground making it impossible for local departments to fight a blaze.
18 Jul 2015

Air Force turbine offline for repairs

The Air Force first shut down the 389-foot-tall turbine, manufactured by Fuhrlander, in May of 2014 after there was an indication the gearbox was failing, Forbes said. Metal flakes were found in some oil, she said. ...It took time to get the funds approved for a new gearbox and a contract to hire a company to do the work. The project cost is $600,000, Forbes said.
23 Jun 2015

Uiryeong locals occupy wind turbine construction site in protest

A protest against the development of a wind power complex around Hanu Mountain and Maebong Mountain in Uiryeong County, Gyeongsangnam-do has been continuing for two weeks at the construction site. About 10 to 30 locals are occupying the site, delaying the construction. ...The committee is demanding that the company set standards for low-frequency noise and conduct simulations of possible landslide accidents.
10 Jun 2015

Wind turbine hazards multiply

The hazards faced by workers performing maintenance work on wind turbines are increasing as the turbines multiply and grow larger, Craig Bierl, an assistant vice president and senior energy risk specialist for the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies ...Many of the hazards are garden variety, he said, but workers encounter almost all of them -- falls, confined spaces, fire hazards, lockout/tagout, first aid, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and arc flash safety -- 300 feet above the ground, making rescue or descent difficult.
9 Jun 2015

OSHA investigating wind farm construction death near Elgin

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Omaha office has opened an investigation into the report of a worker's death, Wednesday, May 27th. The 40-year-old temporary worker was working for Wanzek Construction, Inc., which is constructing the Prairie Breeze Wind Energy Center for Invenergy near Elgin, Nebraska.
29 May 2015

Expanding blades bring new challenges

Leading-edge erosion continues to be a high priority for further research and development. According to Andrew Kay, renewable technology engineer at ORE Catapult, blades that lack sufficient leading-edge protection are showing serious signs of erosion after only two years, causing significant power production losses. 
29 May 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=24&topic=Safety
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