Library filed under Impact on People

Health Effects of Wind Turbine Noise

Nina_pierpont__health_effects_of_wind_turbine_noise__2-4-06_thumb Industrial wind turbines produce significant amounts of audible and low-frequency noise. Dr. Oguz A. Soysal, Professor and Chairman of the Dept. of Physics and Engineering at Frostburg State University in Maryland, measured sound levels over half a mile away from the Meyersdale, PA, 20-turbine wind farm. Typical audible (A-weighted) dB (decibel) levels were in the 50-60 range, and audible plus low-frequency (C-weighted) dB were in the 65-70 range. 65-70 dB is the loudness of a washing machine, vacuum cleaner, or hair dryer. A difference of 10 dB between A and C weighting represents a significant amount of low-frequency sound by World Health Organization standards.
4 Feb 2006

Powerful change in wind - Towering turbines bring income for some, clean power for state, but some say costs too high

For those who live among the towers, the consequences of the development are palpable. The construction required building new roads and widening existing ones to make room for oversize vehicles. Hundreds of workers moved into town or stayed in trailers on the job site during the summer rush. The rural landscape was transformed into an industrial setting. Where stands of poplars and fields of corn and hay covered the plateau, the smooth lines of the light gray towers and steady rotation of the rotors now define the view. And the noises changed. The unobstructed wind has always been the dominant sound on the plateau. Now, the whoosh of the wind is mixed with the hum of the machines and a mechanical whomp of the blades turning.
30 Jan 2006

Noise Issues: Don Bly's Letter to the Windham Regional Commission

Windmills can create many vibrations and sounds at different frequencies depending on their size, the wind speed, whether the windmills are operating synchronously (in tandem or not); and whether the noise “beats” or throbs. The noise does not have to be loud to be disturbing. Pulsating low frequency noise can be very disturbing, especially at night when you are trying to sleep. Editor's Note: Don Bly cautions readers that while he has done his homework "I should not be quoted as being a sound or noise expert".
30 Jan 2006

In March, push comes to shove

We hope other Virginia localities watching these proceedings will profit from learning that currently unreliable wind power is green only for those who are allowed to siphon off government money at taxpayers’ expense and that as this high-cost energy is fed back into the grid, it will result in higher, not lower, electric bills for users. And we hope the cumulative anguish of Highlanders expressed during the hearings will give other decision-makers pause when they consider the real costs of wrongly-sited wind power.
5 Jan 2006

Cumulative Impact of Wind Farms In The Outer Clyde Estuary

Cumulativeimpact_thumb A study of the Outer Clyde Estuary, covering Kintyre, Cowal, Arran, Bute, Inverclyde and North Ayrshire, conducted by AWF, demonstrates the huge and increasing pressure on the area from wind farm developers. It concludes, that if all the wind farms in or approaching the planning system at present are approved, the level of cumulative impact will degrade the environment of this unique area to a totally unacceptable extent. It would not be an exaggeration to state that every transport route (road or ferry) would have a prominent view of at least one wind farm. The need for a strategic review is overwhelming.
1 Jan 2006

Meyersdale Wind Generation Facility - Acoustic Noise Generated by Wind Turbines

Soysal12-24-05_thumb Presented at the Lycoming County, PA Zoning Board Hearing on 12/14/2005 Overview • Measurements at distance of 0.55 miles from wind farm in Meyersdale, PA – Sound level measurements – Sound recordings • Analysis of the frequency composition of the noise generated by wind turbines • Analysis of the ambient noise level as a function of wind speed • Discussion of the wind turbine noise characteristics
24 Dec 2005

Paul Kenyon's Defense of Vermont's Ridgelines in Letter to Gaye R. Symington, Speaker of Vermont's House of Representatives

Dear_ms_symington_121905_thumb The ridgelines, once developed, are likely to remain developed as can so well be seen by the justification for the East Mountain and Little Mt. Equinox proposals: because the roads are already there. Roads are the principal harbingers of development. Once put in, and at great cost, it will be argued, even after the turbines are no long needed, that they be used for something else. We are talking about exchanging something priceless that should go to our children and grandchildren for the short term gain of something that can be had by other means. It is a matter of relative value and to me and many others, the ridgelines are priceless. It think most Vermonters, once they open their eyes to what is about to happen and realize the value of what they are about to lose, will agree.
19 Dec 2005

No cooling breeze in wind debate

Keep wind turbines out of Yass Valley Council area and maintain pristine ridge lines was the overwhelming message from a meeting in Bowning last Tuesday night. Organised for those concerned about the proposed installation of wind generators on Black Range west of Yass, the meeting elected a committee to lobby local and state governments, and to raise awareness within the local community.
15 Dec 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=232&topic=Impact+on+People
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