Articles filed under Impact on Wildlife

Residents speak out against wind farm

More than 700 Greenbrier County residents have sent letters to the state Public Service Commission, opposing a plan to build one of the largest wind-power projects east of the Mississippi River. The residents say the wind turbines will spoil mountain views, decrease property values, kill bats and birds, hurt tourism and ruin hunting and fishing in the area. They predict the wind turbines will catch fire during lightning strikes. And they say the turbines will interfere with emergency radio communications.
23 Nov 2005

Conservation campaign launched to preserve Pa.'s Kittatinny Ridge

Ottaway News Service HARRISBURG -- The Kittatinny Ridge, a 185-mile forested highland linking the Delaware Water Gap, Susquehanna Water Gap and the Mason-Dixon line, is the focus of a new conservation effort. A campaign by Pennsylvania Audubon seeks to place Kittatinny Ridge, also known as Blue Mountain, in the public consciousness as the largest uninterrupted forest area in eastern and central Pennsylvania. Kittatinny Ridge faces multiple threats from ill-planned development as well as an overabundance of deer, insect pests and illegal dumping by humans, the environmental group says.
17 Nov 2005

Pine Tree Wind pacts OK'd Contracts awarded for 'green power' project

Calling it "our baby," the panel overseeing the Department of Water and Power moved forward Tuesday with the Pine Tree Wind Project, approving a pair of environmental and construction deals related to the $278 million initiative.p The venture has been held up as an example of both the promise and peril associated with the growing use of "green power," which is one of the top priorities of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's new Board of Water and Power Commissioners.
16 Nov 2005

Wildlife Protection Laws – Are they Applied?

My experience with the Bald Hills wind farm has highlighted what I believe to be a general failure in the application of the laws. The consequence is that many species that are supposed to be protected are not. I have provided a couple of examples below however it would be easy to select more. This failure to respond properly to wildlife protection laws could be occurring on other impact assessments for other types of projects proposed at other locations throughout Victoria.
1 Sep 2005

Citizens Sue Norton for Wildlife Death Information

Charleston, WV—Twenty citizen groups from around the country are supporting a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed against U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary, Gale Norton, by the Friends of Blackwater.  The lawsuit charges that Norton has refused to turn over documents relating to wildlife deaths and injuries from wind turbines. “Department of Interior has not justified withholding these important documents,” said Judy Rodd, Executive Director of Friends of Blackwater.
16 Nov 2004

Wind power or horse power?

"WALES has some of the most breathtaking riding country in Britain, but it has sometimes been slow to capitalise on its tourism potential. This is starting to change, and in North Wales plans for horse holidays with grant backing are well underway." Ann West relates: "But when they were ridden along a bridlepath towards the windmills, the horses became upset by the noise and the big moving shadows of the blades on the ground. I was worried for the riders' safety so we turned back after passing just two windmills."
24 Jun 2004

Memorandum to the Riley County Planning Board (KS) regarding the placement of industrial wind turbines in the Kansas Flint Hills

Although my research started with the visual and spatial aspects of WECSs, and continues to be focused on WECSs effects on “landscape character” i.e. impacts on the spatial environment, with implications for cultural values and social systems of our region. I am equally concerned about the predictable negative effects of WECSs on the natural systems of the Flint Hills. I am concerned about serious cumulative effects and the degradation of: the visual character of our environment; the social fabric of communities that are facing the prospect of WECS-C; the health of biological, ecological components of our regional ecosystem; and the long term viability of our local, increasingly “nature-based” economy.
1 Mar 2004

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=148&topic=Impact+on+Wildlife&type=Article
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