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Wind power projects eyed for Maine

New England's largest operating project is a 6.6-megawatt, 11-turbine wind farm in Searsburg, Vt., run by Green Mountain Power Corp. The other commercial-scale project -- perhaps the region's most visible Ð is the single, 164-foot-high turbine in Hull, Mass. Flights out of Boston's Logan Airport sometimes pass right by it.
21 Nov 2005

Sheffield wind project presents latest plans

SHEFFIELD – Officials behind a major wind project proposed here unveiled more details of their plans Thursday evening, meeting with the planning commission as required by the state law that regulates energy projects. Massachusetts-based UPC Wind Management presented the update, bringing in its president, power sales director, project manager, lawyer, publicist and environmental consultant. They were joined by Avram Patt, general manager of East Montpelier-based Washington Electric Co-op.
20 Nov 2005

What is a mountain for? Worship or work?

When all the arguments and reasoning are done, and decisions must be made, it comes down for me to something other than opinion. Something so utterly personal it is inarguable. A mountain is more than what we want from it. It is a matter of sanctity.
20 Nov 2005

New energy storage facilities could take the wind out of the sails of the intermittency debate

If the wind isn't blowing at peak times, the argument goes, then the wind turbines are not contributing to the power in the grid. However, if wind farms could store all the power they generate at off-peak times, during the night for example, and then control the way and time it is released, it would not only enhance the revenue streams they could receive, but also remove the intermittency claims. Now, a Canadian energy management firm claims to be able to do just that. EPOD International has secured two pilot projects with wind power developers in Canada and the US to test their proprietary energy storage system, the EMT.
19 Nov 2005

Wind turbines not friendly, not wanted

..wind development is highly industrial. It's construction is devastating. It's appearance is horrific. It's damage to the environment, wildlife, tourism and real-estate is indisputable. With all that ugly negativism, there should be superb compensating benefits. But there are not. There is no beef. There is no real service for the public good. It's just another tax shelter for the super rich.
18 Nov 2005

Putting the Spin on Wind

It’s going to get complicated and emotional, but whatever comes out in the wash is certain to affect the backyards of all Highland residents one way or another. And certainly, those of all Virginians. Editor's note: a 'Flow Chart on Wind Energy Players in Virginia' that accompanied this article is available as a 'document' (11/18/05). The flow chart is an initial effort to show the interconnections/collusion between the different entities working to promote wind development in Virginia.
18 Nov 2005

Renewing Utility Income - Taking another look at the renewables business

Conclusion- Renewable power is here to stay. Utilities should embrace it as an opportunity and work to shape the regulatory and legislative developments so important to the renewables sector. They should develop and implement regulatory strategies for renewables. This new approach requires a careful choice of business model. For some, the traditional build/own/operate model or the newer contract model may make sense. Others will find that a new approach to renewables requires a new business model like the network manager model.
18 Nov 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=1213&topic=General
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