Library filed under Property Values from Vermont

WIND TURBINES: Do property values fall? It depends on who you ask

One of the concerns cited by homeowners is a sharp drop in home values that is caused by the aesthetics, noise pollution and related health effects. Neighbors reference instances where families have abandoned their homes after years of being unable to sell but the developers, Swanton Wind, points to academic and government studies reporting there is no evidence that wind farms damage home values.
17 Aug 2015

Vermont wind turbines harm property values

The neighbors in Swanton will be just over 2,000 feet to the proposed turbines, which is more than 1,000’ closer to the project than any homes on Georgia Mountain. The proposed turbines in Swanton are also nearly 60’ taller than the ones here. So I think it’s safe to say that they have a very valid reason to be worried about their property values.
6 Aug 2015

Wind concerns addressed at Grafton forum

McCafferty said there are multiple problems with wind farms -- such as the aesthetics and the noise associated with them. "People don't come to Vermont to look at wind farms and they don't come to Vermont to hear a lot of noise. So, these are direct impacts on the values," McCafferty said. Before the crowd departed for the night, Wright gave them one last message.
25 Feb 2014

Noise, property values factor in wind forum discussion

In a study McCann did on Lee County, Ill., the average price per square foot for a home outside 2 miles of the wind project was $104.72. For those that were within 2 miles of the project the average sale price was $78.84 per square foot - a decline in value of approximately 25 percent. One couple that was part of a panel at Friday's forum - Scott and Melodie McLane from Georgia, Vt. - experienced the depreciation of the value their home first hand.
20 Jan 2014

The lister changes the decibel level

In one case, as reported in the Sunday Free Press, the value of property was decreased by a whopping $50,000 from a price of nearly $410,000 because of proximity to a wind turbine. A homeowner saw a $700 reduction in the annual tax bill. Now that’s real cash gained because of financial harm — bona fide or perceived, it doesn’t matter. Though in terms of reducing enjoyment of property because of noise, altered views or flicking lights, this change is not exactly a favorable return on investment.
31 Oct 2013

Town listers become next arbiter in Vermont's debate over wind

When Melodie McLane of Georgia used to drive by the wind turbines in Clinton, N.Y., she says, she always looked at them with wondrous curiosity. But now, after four industrial wind towers were built near her home on Georgia Mountain Road, she dreads them. 'I had no idea it would be this bad,' she says, describing a constant noise she says makes it hard to sleep or go outside.
27 Oct 2013

Vermont wind farm blows down home values

The members unanimously agreed that the sound of the turbines-- any sound-- was enough. "It's a noise that's a constant sort of noise. I once described it as if you're on a coastline and way off in the distance, there's a freighter going by and you hear the engine going-- chug, chug, chug. That's the kind of noise that you experience," Vickers explained.
15 Oct 2013

UPC Wind's claims disputed

There are no definitive, objective studies of effects of wind energy projects on property values; however, real estate agents recognize and agree that properties with significant natural views have premium value and intrusions on these views erode value. Read all the references to "beautiful view" in real estate ads. People care greatly about view and buy accordingly.
26 Nov 2005

Wind not a stormy issue in Readsboro, Searsburg

READSBORO — Officials from the two towns most affected by a proposed wind facility met on Wednesday night to discuss the economic impacts of a 30-turbine development. The Readsboro and Searsburg Select Boards met in the Central School gym to discuss the financial benefits and strains that can be expected by a town hosting a wind farm. Robert Ide of the Vermont Department of Public Service attended, as did about 10 residents. Searsburg is now the home of the state's only existing commercial wind facility. There are 11 turbines producing about 6 megawatts of electricity. A 30- to 45-megawatt plant with 20 to 30 new turbines has been proposed for ridgelines spanning both Readsboro and Searsburg.
17 Nov 2005

Review by Hugh Kemper of REPP's 'The Effect of Wind Development on Local Property Values'

Property_v_kemp_review_1__thumb It is noteworthy that this study does not answer the basic question of how wind turbines affect property values. George Sterzinger, executive director of REPP, admitted as much in response to critics who stressed that the study contains no proof that wind farms were the reason for the changes in property values: “ We have no idea”…noting REPP did not have enough time or money to answer that question. (Cape Cod Times 6/20/03).
1 Jun 2004

Londonderry Resident Analyses Beacon Hill's Reports re. Glebe Mountain Environs

Becon_hill_htk_comments_thumb I have reviewed Beacon Hill’s two reports, i.e. 'Free But Costly: An Economic Analysis of A Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound" (March 2004) and ‘Blowing in the Wind' (October 2003) which focused primarily on tourism and property values. The complete reports are available from www.beaconhill.org. The following consists of two parts. Part I addresses some key findings as well as some thoughts on methodology. Part II focuses on what may or may not be applicable to Glebe.
1 May 2004

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Vermont&topic=Property+Values
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