Articles filed under Impact on People from USA

Campo Tribe's former Chair La Chappa and 64 members petition for special meeting over allegedly “corrupt actions” of leadership under Chairman Cuero

After Campo tribal chair Harry Paul Cuero Jr. reportedly refused to recognize a motion or allow a vote on a petition to overturn approval of the new Campo Wind project, as ECM reported, a new petition (posted below this article) has reportedly been presented to Cuero which seeks to remove him and potentially other executive committee members from office.
26 Mar 2020

Industrial wind turbines hurt rural economic development

Rural areas in Iowa are agricultural not industrial. Rural communities should not suffer from noise, shadow flicker, adverse health effects, and devalued homes because of wind turbines. The wind is promoted as free, but the true costs of the wind industry in rural Iowa are not. Is our goal as a state the elimination of rural communities and create a vast industrial scale, corporate ag-industrial mini-state?
19 Mar 2020

Planner wants to protect his parents and the town of Guilderland from too-close, towering wind turbines

Kovalchik_family_article_78__thumb As Guilderland works to amplify and strengthen its solar laws, Kovalchik recommends that the town also begin to work on creating a wind ordinance. He wants the town to join forces with other surrounding municipalities — New Scotland and the Hilltowns — to strengthen their voice, as the state gears up to take over the work of approving large-scale renewable-energy projects. 
18 Mar 2020

He set up a big solar farm. His neighbors hated it.

Across swaths of western New York, anti-solar sentiment has fomented in heated town hall meetings and has surfaced on lawn signs and in Change.org petitions. The movement has had some effect: At least a dozen towns in New York State have placed moratoriums on new solar projects, and several others are weighing temporary bans. Local officials have said that they need time to study the potential impact of the solar farms.
18 Mar 2020

Angry US landowners are killing off renewable energy projects

The conflict stems from the vacant-land myth: the notion that there’s plenty of unused land out there in flyover country that’s ready and waiting to be covered with wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and other infrastructure. The truth is that growing numbers of rural and suburban landowners are resisting these types of projects. They don’t want to endure the noise and shadow flicker produced by 500- or 600-foot-high wind turbines. Nor do they want miles of transmission lines built through their towns, so they are fighting to protect their property values and views.
7 Mar 2020

Angry US landowners are killing off renewable energy projects

The conflict stems from the vacant-land myth: the notion that there’s plenty of unused land out there in flyover country that’s ready and waiting to be covered with wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and other infrastructure. The truth is that growing numbers of rural and suburban landowners are resisting these types of projects. They don’t want to endure the noise and shadow flicker produced by 500- or 600-foot-high wind turbines. Nor do they want miles of transmission lines built through their towns, so they are fighting to protect their property values and views.
7 Mar 2020

Angry US landowners are killing off renewable energy projects

The conflict stems from the vacant-land myth: the notion that there’s plenty of unused land out there in flyover country that’s ready and waiting to be covered with wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and other infrastructure. The truth is that growing numbers of rural and suburban landowners are resisting these types of projects. They don’t want to endure the noise and shadow flicker produced by 500- or 600-foot-high wind turbines. Nor do they want miles of transmission lines built through their towns, so they are fighting to protect their property values and views.
7 Mar 2020

Angry US landowners are killing off renewable energy projects

The conflict stems from the vacant-land myth: the notion that there’s plenty of unused land out there in flyover country that’s ready and waiting to be covered with wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and other infrastructure. The truth is that growing numbers of rural and suburban landowners are resisting these types of projects. They don’t want to endure the noise and shadow flicker produced by 500- or 600-foot-high wind turbines. Nor do they want miles of transmission lines built through their towns, so they are fighting to protect their property values and views.
7 Mar 2020

Wind turbines on the horizon?

Nearly 650 wind turbines in a 30-mile radius, plus the largest transmission line in the state with towers reaching 150-200’ tall – taller than our water towers… That is what Nemaha County residents can look forward to in their future. The view from your vehicle, tractor, or deck will change dramatically in the next two years as Nemaha County becomes industrialized. 
3 Mar 2020

Campo Tribal members plead for legal help, allege rights violated in wind project approval; Seek re-vote

Whistleblowers in the Campo band of Mission Indians claim that their tribal leadership pushed through approval of a massive wind project during an improperly noticed meeting. They have now collected enough signatures to overturn that approval with a revote.  But despite the Feb. 13th deadline to notify tribal members of a meeting to revote on the controversial project, several tribal members say they have not received any such notice.   
14 Feb 2020

Plymouth board declares turbines a nuisance

The four 500-foot ConEdison Solutions wind turbines were installed in June 2016. They sit close to the Bourne border, but because they are located in Plymouth, it has been difficult for Bourne residents to fight through their own town government. Since their installation, the Buzzards Bay Action Committee, a nonprofit group dedicated to preserve and protect Buzzards Bay, has collected approximately 360 complaints from residents in the area. Complaints include shadow flicker, nausea, vertigo, sleep disturbance, headaches, anxiety and sound disturbances. “We have 360 complaints and they go unanswered,” Plymouth resident Larry McGrath said before the vote was taken. “Nobody does anything to protect us.”
14 Feb 2020

“Protect Ames Monument” discovers turbine locations

“The FAA applications were filed on October 17, 2019, a full three months prior to the January Public Scoping meetings. Yet, ConnectGen representative, Amanda McDonald, insisted at the meetings that the turbine locations were not determined. It’s disingenuous for ConnectGen to pretend there isn’t a known project layout.” When plotted using Google Earth, the group found turbines were situated as close as 1,689 feet to area houses, well under Albany County’s setback distance of 5.5 times turbine height. 
7 Feb 2020

Anglers oppose Lake Erie wind turbine project

“Lake Erie is simply too small to sustain any industrial offshore wind project,” said Rich Davenport of Tonawanda, who is active with several sportsmen’s groups, such as the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs and the Western New York Environmental Federation. “The towers will displace water currents for quite a radius around each turbine, impacting nearby spawning shoals (even if sited away from spawning areas, you cannot avoid the current change), coupled with the massive amounts of infrasound, or low frequency noise, each turbine will generate while operating.”
5 Feb 2020

'The silence is gone': Iowans search for solution regarding noise from wind turbines

"You get up every day. You go to work with it every day. I mean the silence is gone, and it's forever gone. Yeah, it's gone," said Tanya and Mike Lamb, of Greenfield. The Lambs live 500 feet down from a wind turbine and can't forget the seven surrounding their property. "It's so loud and it hurts my ears that I mean we can't sit outside," Tanya Lamb said.
31 Jan 2020

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=2&topic=Impact+on+People&type=Article
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