Articles filed under Impact on Birds from USA

Study predicts bird deaths at wind farms

It can be difficult to know exactly how many bird deaths a proposed wind farm may cause while it’s still under review, New said. The only way to know for sure is to build it and observe it, she said. But by then, it’s unlikely that the problem will be fixed. “You’re not going to take it down and move it if you’ve built it in the wrong place,” New said.
3 Aug 2015

Turbine decision creating turmoil

A trio of conservation groups, including Nature Canada, Ontario Nature, and American Bird Conservancy, have joined Mayor Robert Quaiff in lambasting the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) decision to approve the White Pines Prince Edward County Wind Energy Project in an internationally designated Important Bird Area (IBA). ...“These are not just Ontario’s birds.”
23 Jul 2015

Power line work halted after concern raised over protected birds

Abbie Church, conservation director for the conservancy, said she was driving in the area of the grasslands last month when she saw construction crews working and power poles already up. The conservancy had worked to negotiate a restriction on construction activities during the nesting season when it agreed to an easement for the power line project. Nesting generally takes place from April through July.
6 Jul 2015

Another reason to just say “No”

Much of the scenic beauty for which Maine is so widely known will be despoiled. The stated 2,700-Megawatt goal of Maine’s Wind Energy Act would require as many as 1,500 wind turbines, each hundreds of feet tall, with accompanying access roads and new transmission lines, on up to 300 miles of Maine’s hills and mountains. Those transmission lines, to carry the electricity that could be provided by a single, high-quality conventional generator, will add billions of dollars to New England electric bills.
4 Jul 2015

Duke Energy: Looking for Payback

“Duncan’s wholesale attack on birds came out of the blue,” says David Yarnold, Audubon president and CEO. “Based on our sources and the documents we’ve seen, we see this as straight-up corporate payback. Duke has a history of stumbling into controversy, and it appears they’ve done it again.”
26 Jun 2015

Flying blind: Impact of wind turbines on birds poses more questions than answers

East Bay Regional Park District wildlife manager Doug Bell has spent many a day out on these dusty dirt roads over the past 10 years and says what he's seen is troubling. Once one of the world's most densely populated areas for golden eagles, the Altamont has become a "population sink" for the protected raptors. Eagles fly in, and too often, they don't fly out. ...The nearly 5,000 energy-generating turbines there kill birds, and the wind industry should be better regulated. 
6 Jun 2015

Flying blind: Impact of wind turbines on birds poses more questions than answers

East Bay Regional Park District wildlife manager Doug Bell has spent many a day out on these dusty dirt roads over the past 10 years and says what he's seen is troubling. Once one of the world's most densely populated areas for golden eagles, the Altamont has become a "population sink" for the protected raptors. Eagles fly in, and too often, they don't fly out. ...The nearly 5,000 energy-generating turbines there kill birds, and the wind industry should be better regulated. 
6 Jun 2015

To save birds, change rules on wind turbines

A new report last month from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service calls into question the wind industry’s assertion that birds fly well above wind turbines’ rotor blades. Using radar, researchers examined fall migration at two locations in Michigan. They found that the greatest density of birds and bats migrating at night occurred from 300 to 500 feet above ground. That’s almost directly at hub height for the new generation of giant turbines.
5 Jun 2015

New wine in an old bottle? Inside the Feds' MBTA incidental take proposal

Authorization for incidental bird mortality might prove more valuable than a vague allusion to prosecutorial discretion for project financing and other purposes, but individual permits for eagle take have proved slow and cumbersome. MBTA permitting could apply much more broadly, making it imperative to avoid a repeat of the eagle permitting experience.
26 May 2015

30,000 wind turbines located in critical bird habitats

An analysis by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) shows that more than 30,000 turbines overlap with federally protected bird habitat, including 24,000 in the migratory corridor of the whooping crane and 3,000 in breeding grounds of the endangered Greater Sage-Grouse. More than 50,000 additional turbines are planned for construction, the group said.
22 May 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=10&topic=Impact+on+Birds&type=Article
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