Library filed under Impact on Landscape from UK

Windfarm proposal: ‘It’s the wrong development in the wrong location’

Aberdeenshire Council’s planning service recommended refusal on the grounds that the application is contrary to its Local Development Plan Policy and added that it would have a visual impact and could have an impact on aircraft and aviation. Councillor Ann Ross said: “I think that the scale of the additional turbines would almost make it an industrial site and the sense of encroachment. I think it’s the wrong development in the wrong location and I have to agree with the recommendation.”
6 Oct 2020

Living in the shadows of wind farm turbine tyrants

Pat’s rural idyll was soon to come to an abrupt end. Mark Hill wind farm with 28 giant turbines to the north of Dochroyle Farm, was granted approval in 2008. It was quickly followed by Arecleoch wind farm with 60 turbines, in 2009 and Kilgallioch with 96 turbines, to the South of Dochroyle, in 2013. Pat’s home is now effectively surrounded by a ring of steel: 184 enormous turbines dominate the landscape on every side. On windy days, even when there is a light breeze, Pat says the audible noise of the turbines is like living next to a motorway. But the audible noise is only part of the problem. She says the infrasound, or low-frequency sound waves with a frequency below the lower limit of audibility, are so distressing that she has been driven to the edge of despair.
26 Sep 2020

Geo-hydromorphological assessment of Europe’s southernmost blanket bogs

Esp.4927_bogs_and_wind_turbines_thumb This study examines changes in peat bogs resulting from peat extraction and grazing. The study also found that a far more significant impact to these land forms in the long term, with far greater and more rapid change has occurred as a result of windfarm construction. The authors write that "Although the installation of individual turbines over blanket bog often results in the extraction of peat in isolated locations, the associated infrastructure of tracks and electrical cable conduits has wider impact not only on the hydrology, but also on peatland geomorphology." According to the report "Windfarm installations have already significantly altered the functioning of some of these ecosystems, and without urgent protection some of the blanket bogs identified here may soon be lost. Action of a most urgent nature is needed from the governments of Cantabria and Castilla y León in order to retain what remains and restore these systems to important natural carbon sinks." The full report can be accessed by selecting the document links on this page.
6 Aug 2020

Green light for Cleve Hill solar giant

Objectors’ concerns have centred on the impact of the project on local habitats and wildlife and on the size of Cleve Hill’s battery installation. There are fears that a fire could lead to "thermal runaway", causing a plume of toxic hydrogen fluoride gas to drift over the local urban areas in Faversham and Whitsable.
31 Jul 2020

Questions raised over green energy

It is heartbreaking to read, in our P&J on Friday May 1, that the insatiable wind industry is intent on carpeting the finest landscapes, and seascapes, in western Europe with ever more demonstrably useless and hugely damaging industrial wind factories, a simply devastating 74 applications in total.
6 May 2020

Extra high turbines at controversial Denbigh wind farm development 'adds insult to injury'

Clwyd West AM Darren Millar , who opposed the original development, said: "These revised plans will add insult to injury to those who opposed this controversial planning application. "Many of my constituents are concerned about the cumulative visual impact of onshore wind farms in this beautiful part of North Wales and making them even larger and more prominent will do nothing to address their concerns. "I will be pressing the local authority to reject these proposals."
11 Mar 2020

Fears persist about Moray wind farm despite scaled-back proposals

Planners still have concerns about a proposed wind farm in Moray despite developers reducing the size and number of turbines. ...Now the developers have put forward scaled-back proposals – described as a “fall back option” – for the site to north of Archiestown, and west of Rothes. The revised plans reduce the number of turbines by six, with 15 at 490ft and a further eight reaching 570ft.
25 Feb 2020

RSPB comments re: Hornsea Three Development Consent Order

En010080-003105-the_royal_society_for_the_protection_of_birds_post-examination_submission_thumb The attached letter written by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds raises their concerns over Hornsea Project Three, an offshore wind project located in the North Sea. New information has arisen indicating that the project will adversely effect the breeding grounds of the gannet, kittiwake, and black-backed gull populations and negatively impact the integrity of the Flamborough and Filey Coast SPA. The Royal Society urges the Secretary of State to extend the deadline for the project's development order to consider this new information and recommends that alternative energy solutions be explored.
6 Sep 2019

The green energy debate: are wind farms really worth it?

A partnership between Scottish and Southern Energy and the council-owned Viking Energy Shetland, signed in 2005, the windfarm is to largely be built on peatlands, raising fears over carbon release. ...While peatlands cover only 3% of the world's land area they contain nearly 30% of all carbon stored on land. Campaigners and experts warn that damage to the peatlands could be irreversible with degraded peat losing the ability to absorb carbon and potentially releasing thousands of tonnes back into the atmosphere.
25 Aug 2019

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&topic=Impact+on+Landscape
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