Library filed under Energy Policy from UK

Negative pricing will be a ‘big feature’ in net zero transition as UK sees 15 periods in 2020 so far

“Transitioning to a zero carbon grid and increasing the penetration of intermittent, renewable generation means that conditions on the grid can become more volatile." ...But this boom in wind has also meant that constraint management is becoming increasingly challenging and expensive. In the first six weeks of 2020, National Grid made £55.7 million worth of payments for constraint management, almost half of the total of £130 million paid in 2019. 
21 Feb 2020

Green energy: why wind power will never be the answer

The focus shifted to offshore wind farms, and the new Contracts for Difference scheme for their subsidy. A kind of reverse auction, it encouraged operators to put in unfeasibly low bids for the prices at which offshore wind farms would generate. While many have heralded the apparently huge drop in offshore costs, no wind farms have actually begun operating at this rate. Industry experts doubt they ever will, suspecting the low offers were a ruse to lock out competition and then blackmail the government on pain of bankruptcy if the price is not raised. The days where developers saw a prospective wind farm as a licence to print money while policymakers extolled wind energy as clean, green and free are long gone.
25 Aug 2019

Is the UK's clean energy transition stumbling?

Since 2015 there has been a steady erosion of this policy framework: energy efficiency spending has been cut, the cheapest forms of renewables have been locked out of the CfD auctions, support for small scale renewables has been slashed, and plans for renewable heat, new nuclear, and CCS have edged forward at the most glacial of paces.  
8 Nov 2018

Windfarms paid £5M a day to turn off turbines

More than 60 wind farms – most in Scotland – were compensated on October 8. The payouts topped the previous high of £3.4million, sparking fresh criticism of the Scottish Government’s ‘green’ agenda. In very windy conditions, the National Grid cannot cope with the extra energy turbines produce, so firms get ‘constraint payments’ to temporarily shut them down.
29 Oct 2018

Control for Low Carbon Levies

Control_for_low_carbon_levies_web_thumb The United Kingdom has has  taken steps to reduce the financial burden of supporting renewable energy in the country. The Government introduced its new Low Carbon Levies (LCL) framework which was designed to control the cost of supporting low carbon electricity paid by consumers on their electric bills. The plan addresses the costs of the 'Contracts for Difference' (CFD), the 'Renewable Obligation' (RO) and the 'Feed in Tariff Scheme' (FiTs). The government asserted that it will monitor the total cost of these programs and, "Until the total burden of these costs is forecast to fall in real terms over a sustained period, the Control will not allow for new low carbon electricity levies to be introduced.  Based on the current forecast, ...this will rule out new levy spend until 2025." The portion of the Government document is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.  
23 Nov 2017

The Scottish wind-power racket

Wind farm owners in Scotland are making out like bandits; Since 2010, we’ve paid £328m to wind farms not to generate - most of them in Scotland; Westminster must stop Holyrood from consenting new wind farms and extensions.
10 Aug 2017

Government 'preparing to scrap EU’s green energy targets after Brexit’

Former Environment Secretary and Tory MP Owen Paterson told The Daily Telegraph he would be “very happy” to see the back of the green energy directive. He added: “It's distorting the whole energy market. It's like the Sheriff of Nottingham – it transfers money from my poorest constituents to my wealthiest constituents who are putting up pointless wind turbines heavily subsidised.”
15 Apr 2017

Ruth Davidson launches Rural Manifesto with windfarm pledge

The Tories – who are currently vying for second place in the polls with Labour – have committed themselves to giving communities the “right to decide” on windfarm developments in their area. Massive wind schemes throughout the north and north-east of Scotland have sparked a widespread backlash from local residents, concerned that turbines are damaging rural landscapes and hurting tourism.
1 Apr 2016

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&topic=Energy+Policy
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