Library from UK

Renewable Energy Foundation Briefing on UK Energy Polcy

Ref_briefing_doc_1__thumb REF encourages the development of renewable energy and energy conservation whilst safeguarding the landscapes of the United Kingdom from unsustainable industrialisation. In pursuit of this goal, REF highlights the need for an overall energy policy that is balanced, ecologically sensitive and effective. REF is a not-for-profit foundation formed by individuals concerned by the uncontrolled growth in proposals and planning applications for power stations in inappropriate rural areas. We are part of a growing national consensus that the United Kingdom’s energy policy is unbalanced, and that the drive for renewable energy generation has been inadequately planned, a fact that has resulted in a developer-led industrial feeding-frenzy that is neither green nor sustainable. It is improbable that this current broad-scale industrialisation of the countryside will bring about any significant reductions in the emissions of greenhouse gases or meet the long-term energy needs of the UK (as laid out in the Feb 2003 Energy White Paper). We aim to raise public awareness of the issues and encourage the creation of a structured energy policy for the UK, which is both more ecologically sensitive and effective.
15 Jul 2004

Wind power or horse power?

"WALES has some of the most breathtaking riding country in Britain, but it has sometimes been slow to capitalise on its tourism potential. This is starting to change, and in North Wales plans for horse holidays with grant backing are well underway." Ann West relates: "But when they were ridden along a bridlepath towards the windmills, the horses became upset by the noise and the big moving shadows of the blades on the ground. I was worried for the riders' safety so we turned back after passing just two windmills."
24 Jun 2004

Tilting at Windmills: An Economic Analysis of Wind Power

David_hume_institute_thumb This paper, “Tilting At Windmills: An Economic Analysis Of Wind Power”, presents the results of a research project conducted by Professor David Simpson on behalf of The David Hume Institute. The aim of this research is to investigate the underlying economics of wind power. From being a source of energy that until recently appeared only on the fringes of the energy supply system, wind power has, over recent years, moved centre stage in the government’s energy policy. This paper asks whether the economic analysis of this source of energy really justifies such a major role and whether alternative policy options should be considered.
1 Apr 2004

Tilting at windmills

The hostility aroused by the Parham project is not unusual either. Some locals complain that wind farms are noisy, ugly and (citing estate agents) that they reduce property prices. Others, like John Constable, who lives 700 metres away from the airfield, say they are just inappropriate. “I happen to like the Chrysler building,” he says, “but I don't want it near my house.”
18 Mar 2004

"Wind Farms" make people sick who live up to a mile away

"Onshore wind farms are a health hazard to people living near them because of the low- frequency noise that they emit, according to new medical studies. Doctors say that the turbines - some of which are taller than Big Ben - can cause headaches and depression among residents living up to a mile away."
25 Jan 2004

Impact of wind farms on the value of residential property and agricultural land

Windfarmsfinalreport_thumb Executive Summary -60% of the sample suggested that wind farms decrease the value of residential properties where the development is within view -67% of the sample indicated that the negative impact on property prices starts when a planning application to erect a wind farm is made -The main factors cited for the negative impact on property values are: o visual impact of wind farm after completion o fear of blight o the proximity of a property to a wind farm -Once a wind farm is completed, the negative impact on property values continues but becomes less severe after two years or so after completion ..... -The survey suggests that wind farms do not impact on residential property values in a uniform way. The circumstances of each development can be different -This report points to a need for further research to track the impact of wind farms and to examine in particular whether the nature of any adverse impact diminishes as wind farms become an increasingly familiar part of the rural scene.
1 Jan 2004

Windfarms provide no useful electricity

This paper is the explanation provided by Richard S Courtney of why it is not possible for electricity from windfarms to be useful to the UK electricity grid. The explanation was presented at the 2004 Conference of "Groups Opposed to Windfarms in the UK." It includes explanation of why use of windfarms is expensive and increases pollution from electricity generation.
1 Jan 2004

Turbines and Tourism Jobs

Views_of_scotland_on_tourism_thumb An analysis by Views of Scotland of a report published in 2002 by VISITSCOTLAND entitled "Investigation into the Potential Impact of Wind Turbines on Tourism in Scotland".
15 Dec 2003

Inquiry Into The Practicalities of Developing Renewable Energy

Practicalities_of_developing_renewable_energy_thumb The random intermittency of electrical power supplied from many renewable sources, most notably wind, requires a high level of conventional back-up generating capacity to ensure security of supply. As the penetration of intermittent generators increases and becomes a significant proportion of the total, the extra system requirements and costs could pose serious problems. Although the causes of recent well-publicised blackouts have been due to other reasons, intermittency will exacerbate the potential for cascade failure. Editor's Note This paper complements the Irish Grid and Eon Netz reports that address the low capacity credit of wind power.
1 Oct 2003

The Dash for Wind: West Denmark’s Experience and UK’s Energy Aspirations

The_dash_for_wind_denmark_and_uk_thumb During the 1990s, West Denmark experienced a revolution in its generating capacity. Wind capacity grew from almost nothing in the mid-1980s to more than 60% of peak, local consumption in 2002. Similarly, the electricity generating capacity of smaller, decentralized CHP grew from very small beginnings in the late 1980s to almost 50% of the six, central CHP power plants that supply all the major towns with district heating. In a single decade, the nominal generating capacity of West Denmark more or less doubled. In 2002, renewable, mostly wind energy supplied the equivalent of roughly 19% of West Denmark’s consumption. This will increase to 21%, or so, during 2003. There are about 2.7 million residents in West Denmark, so the number of wind generators per head of population is 1.74 machines per 1000 people. In the UK, this would amount to about 100,000. West Denmark is therefore the most intensely wind mill populated land on the planet.
19 May 2003

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&p=313
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