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Impact of wind farms on the value of residential property and agricultural land

Windfarmsfinalreport_thumb Executive Summary -60% of the sample suggested that wind farms decrease the value of residential properties where the development is within view -67% of the sample indicated that the negative impact on property prices starts when a planning application to erect a wind farm is made -The main factors cited for the negative impact on property values are: o visual impact of wind farm after completion o fear of blight o the proximity of a property to a wind farm -Once a wind farm is completed, the negative impact on property values continues but becomes less severe after two years or so after completion ..... -The survey suggests that wind farms do not impact on residential property values in a uniform way. The circumstances of each development can be different -This report points to a need for further research to track the impact of wind farms and to examine in particular whether the nature of any adverse impact diminishes as wind farms become an increasingly familiar part of the rural scene.
1 Jan 2004

Windfarms provide no useful electricity

This paper is the explanation provided by Richard S Courtney of why it is not possible for electricity from windfarms to be useful to the UK electricity grid. The explanation was presented at the 2004 Conference of "Groups Opposed to Windfarms in the UK." It includes explanation of why use of windfarms is expensive and increases pollution from electricity generation.
1 Jan 2004

Turbines and Tourism Jobs

Views_of_scotland_on_tourism_thumb An analysis by Views of Scotland of a report published in 2002 by VISITSCOTLAND entitled "Investigation into the Potential Impact of Wind Turbines on Tourism in Scotland".
15 Dec 2003

Inquiry Into The Practicalities of Developing Renewable Energy

Practicalities_of_developing_renewable_energy_thumb The random intermittency of electrical power supplied from many renewable sources, most notably wind, requires a high level of conventional back-up generating capacity to ensure security of supply. As the penetration of intermittent generators increases and becomes a significant proportion of the total, the extra system requirements and costs could pose serious problems. Although the causes of recent well-publicised blackouts have been due to other reasons, intermittency will exacerbate the potential for cascade failure. Editor's Note This paper complements the Irish Grid and Eon Netz reports that address the low capacity credit of wind power.
1 Oct 2003

The Dash for Wind: West Denmark’s Experience and UK’s Energy Aspirations

The_dash_for_wind_denmark_and_uk_thumb During the 1990s, West Denmark experienced a revolution in its generating capacity. Wind capacity grew from almost nothing in the mid-1980s to more than 60% of peak, local consumption in 2002. Similarly, the electricity generating capacity of smaller, decentralized CHP grew from very small beginnings in the late 1980s to almost 50% of the six, central CHP power plants that supply all the major towns with district heating. In a single decade, the nominal generating capacity of West Denmark more or less doubled. In 2002, renewable, mostly wind energy supplied the equivalent of roughly 19% of West Denmark’s consumption. This will increase to 21%, or so, during 2003. There are about 2.7 million residents in West Denmark, so the number of wind generators per head of population is 1.74 machines per 1000 people. In the UK, this would amount to about 100,000. West Denmark is therefore the most intensely wind mill populated land on the planet.
19 May 2003

Wind Farms: Myths and Facts- David Bellamy, a UK botanist, looks at the myths and facts of industrial wind energy from a UK perspective

Bellamy_1__thumb Having had hundreds of queries from park owners, park users and other members of the public concerned about the increasing number of wind farms in the planning pipeline I have put this document together. Please note I have been helping campaign against wind farms for over 10 years so my view are somewhat partisan, however, I urge you to read the following before coming to your own conclusions.
1 Jan 2003

Cap Gemini Ernst & Young launches European deregulation Index

In conclusion, this study has shown that in many countries deregulation is having the expected effect of increased competition leading to price reduction. However, it is evident that pricing in markets depends not just on the status of deregulation, but also on the broader aspects of competition. Key factors here include the balance of supply and demand, generation fuel costs, the learning process that new markets go through, competition within different market segments and the costs of access to transmission and distribution networks. Deregulation is a long-term process that requires sustained attention.
1 Nov 2002

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&p=312
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