Library filed under Impact on Views from Rhode Island

Scary new bill will allow anyone with a farm to install wind turbines

Essentially, anyone with a farm will be entitled to install wind turbines, with virtually no setback, and this will pre-empt any local zoning. So beautiful vistas in places like Portsmouth and Jamestown will be up for grabs, and there will be no consideration of the effect on the historic beauty of the area or impact on people’s real estate use or resale values.
22 Apr 2013

Building a virtual wind farm

Hecklau says that the early land-based wind farms were "warmly received," by the public, but controversy has dogged each successive project, especially in the Northeast. Nowadays, there's "not an easy project anymore in the Northeast. Every project, some opposition." Projects in the Midwest, he says, receive much less opposition.
24 May 2010

Environmentalists decry Black Pt. turbine plan

Save The Bay, the leading environmental organization in Rhode Island, is opposing a plan to erect a wind turbine at Black Point, a coastal property in Narragansett that was preserved two decades ago using state open-space bonds. The Providence-based organization joined Tuesday with five other environmental advocacy groups - all supporters of green energy - to send a letter to Governor Carcieri that raises questions about the project. The plans being developed by the state Department of Environmental Management and the Town of Narragansett include the installation of up to six large wind turbines at various sites in the town.
21 Oct 2009

Offshore wind farms considered for Rhode Island

NARRAGANSETT, R.I. - Gov. Don Carcieri's administration this week unveiled a report calling it feasible to build wind farms off the coast of Rhode Island as part of a plan to get 15 percent of the state's energy from wind in five years. Wind is plentiful in pockets along Narragansett Bay, and wind farms could supply much-needed energy to the Ocean State. But in a region where other wind projects have met with opposition, and in a state that prizes its shoreline, there's a lingering question over whether residents will support such a project. "Is aesthetics going to be a problem for people? That's the question. That's really the only question," said Andrew Dzykewicz, commissioner of the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources.
22 Apr 2007
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