Articles filed under Energy Policy from Rhode Island

Market Policies, Emissions Goals on Collision Course in New England

Backers of gas generation countered that renewables are benefiting from government-backed subsidies and long-term contracts that threaten to reintroduce government-mandated integrated resource planning. ...state policies are giving renewables undue advantage and undermining conventional generators’ investments in the market.
21 Mar 2016

Southern New England states work together to request renewable energy proposals

Companies designing projects to bring clean electricity to southern New England say they’re grateful Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island have finally made a request for proposals to carry that power to the region. But meeting the region’s longer-term goal of expanding the use of renewable electricity from wind, solar and hydroelectricity will require more transmission capacity than the states requested, said Edward Krapels, the CEO of Anbaric Transmission, which is proposing one project in Maine and another Vermont.
24 Nov 2015

ISO New England eyes solar, wind, gas in low growth, energy efficiency focused next decade

Washington -- Aggressive energy efficiency efforts and new distributed generation capacity -- virtually all of it in the form of solar projects -- are combining to put a lid on growth in peak demand and electric use in New England, ISO New England said in its newly released 2015 Regional System Plan.
9 Nov 2015

Conservation group slams 'secret' work between governors, utilities

“The states and NESCOE are deliberately working out the details of this plan in secret, consistent with the view of one of NESCOE’s staffers that the plan should be ‘formulated behind closed doors’ because the ‘court of public opinion can be fickle and recalcitrant,’ ” Courchesne wrote, quoting an email from a NESCOE staff member to Executive Director Heather Hunt.
25 Jun 2014

Reporter: Wind Resistance

The opposition is prepared to assert that wind farms are visual blights and environmental disturbances. But Deepwater’s adversaries believe that the high cost of this particular type of green energy is their strongest argument. A stack of handouts by the door to the Narragansett Town Council chambers raised the alarm. They proclaimed: “Wind Power Invasion Coming Soon,” and warned of a “predatory development,” and “a risky venture,” doomed to fail, while guaranteeing “huge profits” to Deepwater Wind.
9 Mar 2014

Deepwater Wind opponents look to Maine as new power source

While Ehrhardt acknowledges the fact that National Grid has signed an agreement with Deepwater, he believes there should be some re-negotiating about this agreement. "There are contracts in place, so I'm not suggesting we just walk away from our obligations, as foolish as they may be," said Erhardt, referring to the PPA between National Grid and Deepwater. "Instead, we should consider contractual renegotiating, by trying to come up with a buyout asking Deepwater to reimburse us."
8 Oct 2013

Wind-farm power deal appeal heard

An attorney for the Conservation Law Foundation and another representing Toray Plastics and Polytop Corp. urged the five justices to allow their petitions against a contract for the sale of power from the wind farm to proceed to a full hearing. ..."Every time renewable-energy projects are advanced through illegal methods, it creates a backlash against renewable energy," Elmer said.
7 Apr 2011

Hummel Report on Net Metering

Two years ago, in an effort to promote wind energy, the legislature changed the law on "net metering'' - a practice that allows the owners of wind turbines to sell any power they don't use back to National Grid. It seemed to make sense ...but, as Jim Hummel finds, the change in law opened up a loophole that is now the subject of an investigation by the Public Utilities Commission.
20 Jan 2011

SAMP plan to expand state power over coastal waters up for vote

Deepwater has said time is of the essence to take advantage of federal tax credits that expire at the end of 2012. The company has paid $3.2 million to defray the cost of the SAMP. Another $2.8 million has come from the state; $700,000 came from the U.S. Department of Energy and $2 million from the federal stimulus. The plan's creators say the source of money had no impact on the results of the plan.
19 Oct 2010
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