Articles filed under Impact on Landscape from Pennsylvania

Neighbor worries about wind turbines’ impact around Buck Mountain

“I’m worried about the windmills changing the township forever,” Palubinsky said. “The wildlife, the reptile life, the snakes, the birds, everything will be affected. “The view will be awful — blinking red lights, turbines spinning all night long … Things will just change forever. We won’t have the beautiful scenery that we’ve had forever. It will turn into an industrial-type area rather than a natural, beautiful area.”
5 Apr 2015

Says wind project truths lack strong local ‘wins’

Remember that they will be taking off many feet from the top of the mountains to level the ground in order to build. These mountains will never, ever be the same for thousands of years to come, for what purpose? A 25-year wind development (that benefits E.ON and Volkswind) and a possible income of unknown amount to the community. This is not a positive effect or win for surrounding communities.
18 Feb 2014

Oppose wind turbines on Jack's Mountain

The sharply peaked ridgelines of Jacks and Stone are far too narrow for the towers. Not mentioned in the Daily News article is that the construction of the towers and access roads will require removal of a significant portion of the mountain top, perhaps as much as 100 feet (or more) of elevation in some places. That is not a typo - imagine our ridges with 100 feet blasted off the top: environmental destruction on a huge scale.
6 Sep 2013

Wind turbines wrong for lake

Consider the construction consequences. The pile drivers pounding in the monopoles stands will certainly disrupt the fish and fish migrations. Don't be fooled by the developers who claim wind turbines improve fishing. There is no proof. Lake Erie is already regarded as a world-class trophy fishery for bass and walleye, and we do not need wind developers to make it better.
17 Aug 2013

For green believers, Turkey Point wind turbines cause some internal strife

It is actually difficult to put wind turbines on land where they don't interfere with bird flyways, said Phil Wallis, executive director of the Pennsylvania Audubon Society. The steady winds needed to make wind energy economically viable are the same that birds use ...the official position of Audubon to support wind energy -- just not this project, because it is not "sited" properly.
24 Aug 2010

Tilting at windmills; A Finger Lakes family and their quiet village brace for the big wind

"They stole our peace with a smile on their faces," says Judy. Hal has been speaking out about the unexpected noise problems from the newly erected turbines for a year now. The sound has been described as that of a jet engine taking off, an expressway, or the constant drone of a tractor. The Grahams say that leaseholders in Cohocton were told the sound of the turbines was likened to that of a refrigerator running, but that's not what they hear.
1 Mar 2010

Authority weighs wind farm plan

Some of the same conservationists who laud wind power as a cleaner, renewable resource are concerned about the turbine proposals. They fear bats and birds will get caught in the powerful windmill blades or the turbines will scare them away. ''It's not recommended that wind farms be built where there is a large concentration of birds,'' said Rick Wiltraut, a local ornithologist. ''Unfortunately, all that area is prime habitat for neotropical birds.''
29 Nov 2009

Local turbine application submitted

A proposal to build wind turbines in central Bedford County took a step forward when the project developer submitted a construction permit application to the state recently. ...The 30-day public comment window for the permit closes at the end of November, but Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection spokeswoman Theresa Candori said the agency has already received enough requests for a public meeting to warrant holding one. The meeting hasn't yet been scheduled.
27 Nov 2009

Wind farm fans local debate

Opponents and supporters of a proposed wind farm in Centre and Blair counties used a public hearing Monday night to express their opinions about the turbines Gamesa Energy USA wants to build. The state Department of Environment Protection held the hearing specifically to take testimony on the national pollution discharge elimination system permit it handles. But, the limited topic did not stop those who spoke from commenting more generally about Gamesa's proposed Sandy Ridge Wind Farm.
24 Nov 2009

Environmentalists, DEP raise issues with wind farm

Iron pyrite was among the risks to water quality that opponents of the Sandy Ridge Wind Farm pointed to during Monday's state Department of Environmental Protection public hearing. "Given the formations, there is a likelihood there's some up there," Michael J. Byle, a civil engineer who is working with Gamesa USA, said after the public meeting and hearing on the proposed wind farm. Core drilling has just begun, and the company is looking for the acid rock.
24 Nov 2009

Zoning and changing times a backdrop to neighbor against neighbor

David Yoder's been farming for more than a third of a century. He's at least the fourth generation of his family who have lived and worked on the land on Cowpath Road near the border of Franconia and Salford townships that has been farmed "forever," Yoder said. Adding a 140-foot cellular tower and a power-generating wind turbine with a blade that reaches to a height of 163 feet will give the farm reduced electric bills and rental income from the cell tower and is similar to adding animals, crops or farm buildings, he said.
13 Nov 2009

Bell Acres residents question windmill plan

Opposing perspectives rose from residents who gathered Monday to probe the proposed alternative energy development site along Big Sewickley Creek Road in Bell Acres. Many borough residents questioned the potential noise level and electromagnetic presence of the site, which would include a 66-foot wind turbine. Others questioned the potential threat to great blue herons that nest along Big Sewickley Creek. Some questioned the visual impact on the borough's landscape.
12 Oct 2009

Noise concerns, bird habitat hold up alternative-energy plans

Bell Acres Council will soon decide whether one more footprint will disturb the great blue herons and other residents. An alternative-energy demonstration site - involving a single 66-foot-high wind turbine, a 15-foot-high turbine, some solar panels and a trailer - has been proposed by a collaboration of Metal Foundations (Ambridge), Vox Energy (Allison Park) and Jet Industries (Ellwood City) for a site near the intersection of Big Sewickley Creek Road, also designated as the Red Belt, and Turkeyfoot Road.
11 Oct 2009

Wind farm, sewage plan discussed

Township resident Gary Swope, who has expressed concerns about the impact of the turbines at past meetings, said he had given the supervisors a letter prior to the meeting listing some problems three residents in Somerset County have experienced. In one instance, a homeowner some 2,500 - 3,000 feet from a turbine said the noise at times was similar to a jet engine and added that 30y people in that area are concerned with the aesthetic impact that turbine have on the landscape. In a second instance, a woman who lives 1,300 feet from a turbine said she can hear the noise inside her closed house and that she has measured the noise level there at 55-65 decibels.
11 Sep 2009

Officials approve 335-foot turbines

Logan Township supervisors will allow a wind farm developer to build the nation's next-to-tallest wind turbines in Chestnut Flats. Supervisors voted 4-to-1 Thursday night to allow Gamesa Energy to build 19 turbines north of Altoona, making them visible from 17th Street, Mill Run Road, Old Mill Run Road and along Route 36. Because of the vote, the turbines can placed on 335-foot towers, rather than 270 feet as allowed by ordinance.
10 Jul 2009

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Pennsylvania&topic=Impact+on+Landscape&type=Article
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