Library filed under Impact on Economy from Ohio

As turbine effort secures financing, conservationists speak out

The project was technically feasible, but the energy output from the turbines — 120 to 500 megawatts — would have cost two to four times more than land-based wind, according to a NYPA news release. The NYPA said annual subsidies of between $60 million and $100 million would result in high costs to the New York Power Authority. Great Lakes Wind Truth and NA-PAW were outspoken against the GLOW project, with hundreds of residents in the town of Greece, N.Y., signing a petition against it.
22 Dec 2013

Wind backers worried about state rule change; Lawmaker says ‘cry me a river’ to those questioning proposed bill

Much of the opposition to the legislation is from developers who are essentially receiving a subsidy because of the requirement to produce much of that energy in Ohio, Seitz said. He argued his proposal would help the environment but create more competition to produce that energy. “Cry me a river,” Seitz said of critics. “Is it about being green or making people money?”
6 Oct 2013

Wind power has its fans, critics

"Take all of these [economic] impact studies with a huge grain of salt," said David Kreutzer, a research fellow in energy economics and climate change at the conservative Heritage Foundation. ..."They show the impact of the spending and leave out the impact of generating the revenue so that you have to spend it in the first place," he said.
15 Jul 2012

County residents speak out about projected wind farm developments

A few landowners in Logan County might have the opportunity to lead the way in Ohio with the largest wind power operation in the state if the plans of a few green-energy companies prosper on properties in Jefferson, Monroe and Rushcreek townships. However, the proposed construction of up to 120 wind turbines in as soon as a year, each up to 550 feet tall, might be a bad move the community will have to live with for a long time, opponents say. Nearly 100 local residents met Tuesday afternoon at Marmon Valley Farm to discuss the implications of turning Logan County into what would fast become the largest wind power community in the state, while several posed the question: Are developers and landowners moving too quick with a decision that will affect the local community and disturb Logan County’s historic and scenic landscape for generations to come? After extensive research, Tom Stacy of Zanesfield, and others, believe so. “This is a way to shelter big company profits from taxes,” Mr. Stacy said. “It’s a symbol; it’s a monument that we’re doing something to conserve energy. The only thing is: It’s not conserving energy. They want to put up at least 100 to 120 of these things soon and it’s going to devastate the property values and scenery around them for miles.”
28 Feb 2007
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