Documents filed under Property Values from New York

Exploring the impact of the proposed Galloo Island energy project

307007559-clarkson-nanos-galloo-island-wind-farm-study_thumb The Town of Henderson, New York, engaged the Nanos Clarkson Research Collaboration energy consultant team to assist in determining a series of impacts from the proposed Galloo Island wind farm development. The Galloo Island project plan proposes to construct up to 29 turbines with a total nameplate capacity of 102 MW. The turbines will stand 575 feet high, with blade lengths of 210 feet. The executive summary and key findings of the study are provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
20 Jan 2016

Hammond property value protection agreement

Residential_property_value_guarantee_agreement_-_town_of_hammond_wind_law_recommendation_-_122810_thumb The Town of Hammond in New York is working to amend its wind law to require developers siting wind turbines within two miles of a property to sign a value guarantee agreement that would ensure property owners are appropriately compensated should they experience a decrease in value due to the turbines.
28 Dec 2010

The Wayward Wind

Silver_lake_speech_thumb Because time seems to be running out on fossil fuels and the lure of non-polluting windpower is so seductive, some people are now promoting windpower initiatives at any cost, without investigating potential negative consequences-- and with no apparent knowledge of even recent environmental history......Throughout my experience, I could not substantiate a single claim developers made for industrial wind energy, including the one justifying its existence: that massive wind installations would meaningfully reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. When you understand this, you realize the wind business is not really that complex. But there are a lot of complicated issues swirling around it that obscure and distract from this main point, issues such as global warming, property values, the nature of wind leases, local revenues and taxes, wildlife, natural views, and a host of others. So how does one know the truth of it all? How does one go about separating the reality from spin?
19 Jun 2006

Impacts of Windmill Visibility on Property Values in Madison County, New York

Effects_windmill_vis_on_prop_values_hoen2006_thumb Project Report Submitted to the Faculty of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy..in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Environmental PolicyEditor's Note: There are two recurring themes in this study: (1) the results are applicable only to Fenner and (2) much more research is needed. What is clearly missing is a ‘sense of place’, a variable acknowledged by the author as important but left unaddressed. What we’re told is that Fenner is a ‘rural farming community’. We have no sense of what drives residents/prospective residents to live in (or, for that matter, to leave) Fenner. We have no sense of ‘public attitudes’, another variable the author clearly ties to property values but leaves unaddressed. What is noticeably missing are house sales within 0.75 miles of the wind plant, i.e. those that would presumably be most impacted by noise and shadow flicker. In the absence of more authoritative studies, we know from press reports associated with wind plants and wind plant applications that ‘opposition’ appears to be lowest in ‘farming’ communities in which farmers view the turbines as a ‘cash crop’ and local municipalities covet the related taxes. We also know from these sources that opposition is greatest in communities that have something to ‘protect’, i.e. treasured/scenic natural assets (ridgelines, shorelines, unique/sensitive habitats), tourist/second home based economies and/or wildlife. Where these are issues, it is hardly a ‘leap of faith’ to surmise that property values will fare comparatively worse than in communities where these issues don’t exist and that properties specifically impacted by the turbines (view/noise/shadow flicker, etc) will fare the worst. As the author readily concedes, ‘public attitudes’ is an important determinant of property values and the opposition within these communities often reflects the prevailing public attitude towards wind turbines. After all, LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION is what real estate is all about. Lastly, Hoen offers a useful critique (available below) of the REPP report that is often pointed to by wind turbine developers as evidence that wind plants do not adversely affect property values.
30 Apr 2006

Robert H. Boyle Et Al. V. John Mcglynn Et Al.

2006-ny-boyle-v-mcglynn_thumb Background: One month after the plaintiffs purchased defendants' 133-acre Otsego County property, they learned that plans were in the works for the construction of large wind turbines on the adjacent parcel. They thereafter commenced this action seeking rescission of the contract and money damages stemming from alleged fraud and misrepresentation on the part of defendants in conjunction with the sale. At issue was an order of the Supreme Court denying summary judgment to the defendants. Summary judgment is when the court rules against a party without a trial) to defendants. The court upheld the denial of summary judgment. The ruling can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
20 Apr 2006

Best Practices - Wind Energy Siting Guidelines

This letter, written by Tom Hewson, responds to a New York State resident who had inquired about the impact of industrial wind turbines on property values. The letter specifically critiques the REPP study. It provides as well an overview of other studies that existed as of Fall 2003. "The issue simply comes down to nuisance and aesthetics. If the project creates a nuisance (noise, shadow flicker, TV/cell phone interference, radar interference), it can cause lower property values to adversely affected areas. People can simply apply their own personal evaluation criteria to determine the extent of the property change. What would it be worth to you? Generally, the bigger the nuisance, the larger the devaluation. Localities can minimize nuisances from wind projects by setting minimum setbacks, proper location siting and noise limits. My concern with the REPP study is that it doesn't try to examine the nuisance effect by selecting a large 5 mile area."
5 Nov 2003

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=New+York&topic=Property+Values&type=Document
back to top