Library from New York

County legislators hear views on windmills

HERKIMER - A pair of proponents and one opponent of proposed windmill projects in the county spoke before members of the county legislature Wednesday night, while one legislator offered an update on where things stood with ongoing Payment in Lieu of Taxes negotiations.
19 May 2006

Couple in Howard Denied Request to Have A Statement on Windfarms Read into Minutes of Meeting

Eric and Kyle Hosmer of Howard address the Howard Town Board meeting Wednesday night and asked that a letter they read to the board be placed in the official minutes. The request was denied for the time being. As a courtesy, we are printing portions of that letter here.Editor's Note: The complete letter follows.
11 May 2006

Second group to build wind turbines

As the Long Island Power Authority pushes forward a plan for a contractor to build a massive wind-turbine project off Jones Beach, a second entity says it plans to amass 200 more windmills directly behind it, 15 miles off the coast.
3 May 2006

The Great Wind Debate

This “wind rush” has been brought on chiefly by escalating concerns over global warming, government tax structures and subsidies that encourage development and an increasing awareness of finite supplies of fossil fuels.
1 May 2006

Impacts of Windmill Visibility on Property Values in Madison County, New York

Effects_windmill_vis_on_prop_values_hoen2006_thumb Project Report Submitted to the Faculty of the Bard Center for Environmental Policy..in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Environmental PolicyEditor's Note: There are two recurring themes in this study: (1) the results are applicable only to Fenner and (2) much more research is needed. What is clearly missing is a ‘sense of place’, a variable acknowledged by the author as important but left unaddressed. What we’re told is that Fenner is a ‘rural farming community’. We have no sense of what drives residents/prospective residents to live in (or, for that matter, to leave) Fenner. We have no sense of ‘public attitudes’, another variable the author clearly ties to property values but leaves unaddressed. What is noticeably missing are house sales within 0.75 miles of the wind plant, i.e. those that would presumably be most impacted by noise and shadow flicker. In the absence of more authoritative studies, we know from press reports associated with wind plants and wind plant applications that ‘opposition’ appears to be lowest in ‘farming’ communities in which farmers view the turbines as a ‘cash crop’ and local municipalities covet the related taxes. We also know from these sources that opposition is greatest in communities that have something to ‘protect’, i.e. treasured/scenic natural assets (ridgelines, shorelines, unique/sensitive habitats), tourist/second home based economies and/or wildlife. Where these are issues, it is hardly a ‘leap of faith’ to surmise that property values will fare comparatively worse than in communities where these issues don’t exist and that properties specifically impacted by the turbines (view/noise/shadow flicker, etc) will fare the worst. As the author readily concedes, ‘public attitudes’ is an important determinant of property values and the opposition within these communities often reflects the prevailing public attitude towards wind turbines. After all, LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION is what real estate is all about. Lastly, Hoen offers a useful critique (available below) of the REPP report that is often pointed to by wind turbine developers as evidence that wind plants do not adversely affect property values.
30 Apr 2006

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=New+York&p=171
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