Library filed under Transmission from New Hampshire

Property value impact of the proposed Northern Pass transmission line

Sci_adan_41211_(1)_thumb The Northern Pass transmission line, if built, will carry 1200 MW of renewable energy from Canada to New England. The proposed transmission has set off a firestorm of opposition in New Hampshire where the line will bisect the state and travel through sensitive land areas. The debate concerning property value impacts is similar to the that involving wind turbines. Residents in New Hampshire commissioned two studies, a Resources Impact Report and an Appraisal Report, which looked at how the power line will impact their property. A summary of the two reports is excerpted below. Both reports can be accessed by clicking on the link at the bottom of this page.
12 Apr 2012

Northern pass tries to torpedo Tillotson conservation easement

Yesterday Northern Pass made an emergency filing with the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office seeking to overturn the Tillotson trustees’ decision to conserve the bulk of the Tillotson land. The filing is available here. A future blog post will analyze Northern Pass’s filing in more detail. Tonight's guest blog presents an overview of the filing and looks at the larger implications of this extraordinary document.
21 Dec 2011

From PSNH, more of the same; Poor treatment goes back decades

With Northern Pass, PSNH has proposed a project where the negative impacts are instantly and universally obvious. PSNH wants to permanently disfigure the North Country's most valuable economic and natural asset - its unspoiled beauty - to deliver power not produced in the U.S. and not needed in New Hampshire. At seven recent North Country hearings on the project, more than 2,300 people testified eloquently in opposition.
20 Apr 2011

New Hampshire blocks Hydro-Québec plan

Martin Murray, spokesperson for Public Service Co. of New Hampshire says public opinion is solidly against the venture. The challenge is to determine "how we can achieve a new and significant source of renewable energy at an economic price and do it with as little impact on our north country as possible."
1 Apr 2011

NH power project: Should the lines be buried?

The proposed towers would carry transmission lines starting from Canada along a 140-mile route from northern to central New Hampshire. They would be part of the Northern Pass Project, which would bring hydroelectric power to customers in New England. ...If the project can't be stopped, why not bury the lines underground? "It eliminates the problem of the horrible ugliness of those massive towers," she said.
7 Feb 2011

Hydroelectric power could be key to state cutting gas emissions

Hydro Quebec, NStar and Northeast Utilities are working on the Northern Pass project with the Patrick administration's support. Project organizers say the new line could provide another 1,200 megawatts of hydro electricity, enough to power nearly a million houses. The project is still in early engineering and study phases, with the goal of wrapping up in 2015, the Northern Pass website says.
31 Dec 2010

The Northern Pass: Bringing hydro-power to New England

"What we are trying to do is meet the regional's state's goals to provide a renewable energy source to New Hampshire and New England." But despite its worthy goals, the project has caused a furor in The North Country. ...Russ Johnson is a Columbia resident. "We the people of Northern New Hampshire don't want you. We don't want you defiling our landscape and our economy by forcing your way over our forests and mountains and homes and we will fight you every step of the way."
29 Dec 2010

Wrecking what little we have to benefit investors far below

This power line proposal is, in the best word I can sum up, horrendous. We should not suffer the loss of our last asset, our beauty and scenery and place of self and place, because of the accident of geography as to where we live. We should not suffer because we happen to exist in an apex, where Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Lower Canada meet, because we are "in the way." This isn't a not-in-my-backyard issue. It is far beyond that.
16 Dec 2010
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