Library from New Hampshire

New England Energy Alliance Report Cites Major Challenges in All Parts of New England Energy Infrastructure; Diverse Coalition of Companies and Organizations Form Regional Energy Alliance

New England faces major near-term challenges in all parts of its energy infrastructure including natural gas facilities, electric transmission lines and electric power generation, according to a report released today by the New England Energy Alliance.
9 Nov 2005

Zoners Let Wind Group Bow Out

LYMAN, N.H. -- In the hope of fending off a potentially costly lawsuit, the Zoning Board of Adjustment voted Thursday to allow UPC Wind Management to withdraw its application for a height variance. The wind energy company had sought the variance to the town's 35-foot height ordinance in order to erect a wind-measuring device on Gardner Mountain. This is the second time UPC has withdrawn an application for a variance. It also reneged an application last summer, after a 4-1 preliminary vote by the board to deny the variance. "I want them to get a message as to how we voted. I don't want them to continue to withdraw their application and resubmit," said board member Jim Trudell, who cast the only vote to disallow UPC's withdrawal request. "I think we need to make a stand. This cat-and-mouse thing eventually is going to come to a head, one way or another, and I'd just as soon it comes to a head now." But other board members said they were concerned that if they denied UPC's request to withdraw the application, then voted against granting a variance, the international company would involve the town in a costly legal battle. "Is it going to be worth the money to set a precedent?" Chairman Steve Moscicki asked. "If we have to do this again, if we have to do this 10 times, that's our job." UPC project manager Tim Caffyn did not return calls made to his West Burke, Vt., office this week regarding the company's request to withdraw its application. Caffyn has said that if UPC was allowed to install a 150-foot device to measure wind, and found conditions favorable on Gardner Mountain, the company would likely erect up to 20 wind turbines up to 320 feet high. He has also stated publicly that if Lyman residents are opposed to UPC developing a wind farm in town, the company would look elsewhere. Nearly as soon as UPC submitted its first application for a height variance, residents rallied to oppose any wind turbine development on Gardner Mountain. About 190 of the town's approximately 280 voters signed a petition last fall opposing allowing UPC a height variance. Residents have said during a series of public hearings that UPC does not meet the five criteria required for a variance. After the last public hearing on UPC's application in December, Lyman native Brian Santy submitted three petitioned articles, all related to wind turbines and wind-measuring devices, for this year's annual town meeting. The planning board is scheduled to hold a public hearing on those articles, which seek to make Lyman's zoning ordinances more specific, next Tuesday. Some ZBA members pointed out Thursday that if UPC does reapply for a variance, it would be under different zoning regulations should the petitioned articles pass. "I don't think they'll come back again," board member Terry Simpson said. "They have to have an open door." But members also said they are frustrated that UPC has twice withdrawn its application, and many said they wouldn't be surprised to find UPC knocking on Lyman's door again. "I think doing this a second time is ridiculous," said ZBA member Linda Stephens. "The facts of their case are not going to change," Moscicki said, noting UPC will also need a use variance to erect the device. "If they come back again - three strikes, you're out."
14 Jan 2005

Establishing Wind Power In New Hampshire: Effectively Siting Turbines

Nhwindturbinesiting_1__thumb With the emergence of recent proposals, there appears to be growing interest in expanding renewable energy sources in New Hampshire. New Hampshire’s government has taken several steps to encourage the use of renewables, including setting net metering guidelines for small-scale generators (less than 25 kW) of photovoltaics, hydroelectric, and wind.1 Net metering guidelines in New Hampshire require that utilities purchase any electricity generated by small scale generators in excess of what they use. Further developing renewables beyond small-scale generation, particularly wind, can help New Hampshire increase the proportion of energy generated from renewable sources. In fact, developing the full potential of wind resources in the state holds great promise for helping to meet the state’s energy needs.
1 Jan 2005

Cold Wind Blowing in Lyman

"...Merits of the zoning case aside, there are some important facts about Wind Energy that simply cannot be ignored. Wind has long been promoted as a viable, clean alternative to fossil fuels and people have been conditioned to unconditionally embrace it. In fact, the moral justification for wind as the answer to greenhouse emissions has pitted conservationist against conservationist. And this fight has shamelessly been fueled by the misinformation on wind that the wind developers and their advocates promote."
8 Sep 2004

ISO-NE Load Forecast Methodology

This presentation indicates that for New England the increasing demand for summer-time electricity is greater and increasing faster than winter-time demand. The fast-rising need for power in summer will likely result in construction of new power plants to keep ahead of demand - although inland industrial wind plants will not be able to contribute much to this demand period due to their very low capacity factor during summer months.
19 Dec 2003

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=New+Hampshire&p=178
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