Articles filed under Impact on Economy from Massachusetts

City mulls wind power to cut costs

ATTLEBORO - It may turn out to be pie in the sky, but Mayor Kevin Dumas is looking at wind power to help cut one of the city's biggest electric bills. With the departments of water and wastewater spending $1 million a year for electricity to run the 24-hour, 365-day operations, he's eager to consider the use of wind turbines to help reduce the hefty costs.
21 May 2007

PEI Wind Farm Exports Power To U.S.

A portion of the wind energy generated from newly installed wind turbines located in PEI was wheeled through PEI and New Brunswick and sold to the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) via the international interconnection node in Keswick, N.B. The renewable energy certificates (RECs) that were generated from this transmission were sold separately to independent buyers located in the NEPOOL.
16 May 2007

Windmill project still a go for now, but the clock ticks

HANCOCK - Building inspector William Palmer Jr. said Friday he will accommodate the developmental delays of the Berkshire Wind Project, but only to a point. Palmer said he has issued several permits and extensions to Distributed Generation Systems Inc. since 2000 for 10 planned wind turbines on Brodie Mountain. In that time, contractors have dug five turbine foundations, he said. The latest six-month extension technically expires on June 15, and the project has been halted by a legal suit from the nearby Snowy Owl resort, whose owner, Silverleaf Resorts Inc. claims that construction cut trees from a portion of its land and that some of the turbines would mar the "viewscape" of a planned time share development.
24 Mar 2007

Risky Renewable Business

Five years ago, when developers applied for a federal permit to build the world’s largest offshore wind-energy project off the Cape Cod coast, a widely held presumption was that the project ought to go forward because wind power is inherently good and that Nantucket Sound was as good a place as any to begin the off-shore renewable energy movement. But the Cape Wind project hasn’t moved forward and remains mired in controversy as evidence piles up that its developers chose perhaps the worst location. So, instead of leading the renewable energy movement into the future, Cape Wind may be imperiling that very movement by ignoring legitimate and serious flaws in its project.
24 Oct 2006

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Massachusetts&p=5&topic=Impact+on+Economy&type=Article
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