Library filed under General from Maine

Account emerges for why state workers yanked anti-wind signs in Moosehead region

McDonald said he will continue to pursue the information request because it raises a larger constitutional question around free speech. He is taking Plum Creek at its word, but said the company should have contacted his group, rather than the MDOT, about the sign near its office. He characterized that placement as a mistake. “We just wanted to know where the removal order came from.” 
10 Nov 2015

Removal of anti-wind project signs in Moosehead region feeds tensions

As many as 50 signs protesting wind projects by SunEdison and Everpower were removed by Maine Department of Transportation employees Friday, angering supporters of the Moosehead Region Futures Committee, which opposes the projects ...A transportation department official says the signs in Greenville and Rockwood – which read “Save Moosehead Say No to Wind” – violated state rules.
3 Nov 2015

Maine DOT Confiscates Wind Protestor’s Yard Signs in Moosehead Lake Region

We’ve been warned by other wind groups to expect this type of backlash. I guess your First Amendment rights are forfeited when you fight a wind project. MRFC is about protecting our quality of place and our tourism industry - it’s the economic backbone of this region.” DOT personnel said they got orders from Augusta to take down the signs.
3 Nov 2015

Wind foes come to blows

An opposition group's settlements with developers divide the resistance to wind-power projects in Maine. A$2.75 million settlement announced last month between Friends of Maine’s Mountains and SunEdison involving New England’s largest wind farm, near Bingham, has exposed a deep rift in the state’s wind-power resistance movement. The dispute offers a glimpse into an internal conflict that’s spilling over into the ongoing public debate about the benefits and harms of erecting giant turbine towers along Maine’s remote ridges.
11 Oct 2015

$2.5 million conservation fund set up in Bingham wind pact

A $2.5 million fund directed at conservation projects across western, central and northern Maine has been set up after an anti-wind group earlier this year dropped a lawsuit against the company building a wind farm in Bingham. ...“FMM is committed to preserving Maine’s unique natural resources, particularly its prized mountains.” According to the release, the Friends group is not a beneficiary of the conservation fund.
25 Sep 2015

Could utilities lose money on Bingham wind farm?

"Under the legislation, the Investor Owned Utilities (IOU) receive 2.75 percent remuneration for payments under the contracts, however this amount is expected to be less than the amount of legal expense incurred to obtain approval of the solicitation process, approval of the contracts and compliance with ongoing reporting and rate setting requirements." While that sounds like Unitil may be losing money, Unitil is not quite sure yet to expect. 
6 Jul 2015

The King wind saga: When Record Hill hit Capitol Hill

It was a wind project that received federal funding based on the use of new technology to prevent turbulence, but the development certainly stirred up a political windstorm. David Carkhuff examines the controversy following former Maine Governor Angus King's foray into wind development in Maine. 
18 Jun 2015

Maine wind energy advocates unveil study touting industry’s benefits

O’Connor said the goals set down in the 2008 of 2,000 megawatts of installed wind energy in Maine by 2020 were unrealistic and should be removed from state law. “If the government must choose winners and losers, it must also make adjustments when the predicted winners turn out to be losers,” O’Connor said. She said large-scale wind developers had deep pockets and easily can run over local people who may be in opposition to their projects.
6 May 2015

Nominee for PUC disagrees with LePage on some issues

One of the biggest and broadest challenges ahead in the electricity world is how to pay for the grid upgrades expected to cost about $1.5 trillion nationally between 2010 and 2030, an estimate developed by consultants at The Brattle Group. ...“It all has to make sense for the economics,” Williamson said in a phone interview Monday. “As soon as you start draining money off to pay utilities, you have less to do other things.”
5 May 2015

SunEdison halts talks with Maine regulators on wind energy deals

Renewable energy developer SunEdison has decided not to seek a long-term contract with Maine utilities for its Weaver Wind project, following the Maine Public Utilities Commission’s reconsideration of the terms of a 25-year power purchasing agreement. The company withdrew its project from consideration in a filing Monday.
4 May 2015

Landowner wants to erect 3,000 solar panels in Knox County field

Selectman Duane Vigue said the moratorium is being proposed to allow the planning board time to conduct research since the town has no standards for reviewing a solar panel farm. He said the project would be located in the middle of the historic district of town and the town wants to make sure it does not hurt the neighbors.
31 Mar 2015

Minority voice on Maine utility board staying on after term expires

David Littell, the only member of the Public Utilities Commission who regularly disagrees with Gov. Paul LePage, says he will work on at least three major cases. The lone commissioner at the Maine Public Utilities Commission who has been at odds with the energy policies of Gov. Paul LePage says he’s going to remain on the job after his term expires on March 31.
25 Mar 2015

Long-term wind deals in Hancock, Somerset counties will be reconsidered

The Maine Public Utilities Commission voted Wednesday to take a second look at the terms of two long-term wind purchasing deals the three-person commission approved in December. The makeup of the commission has changed since the December approval, with Carlisle McLean joining the panel in place of former chairman Tom Welch, who retired early at the end of 2014.
26 Feb 2015

Osborn approves multimillion-dollar agreement for new wind farm

Of the $1.87 million, $1.12 million would be in the form of annual payments of $56,000 ($4,000 for each turbine) over 20 years. That much is mandated by state law, which says wind developers must compensate host communities such as Osborn. Of the remaining $750,000, one-third of it would come in a lump sum payment that the town would be required to use for public safety costs. The other $500,000 would be a second lump sum payment for an energy conservation fund. 
26 Feb 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Maine&p=4&topic=General
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