Articles filed under Energy Policy from Kansas

Kansas will suspend all work on Clean Power Plan

Gov. Sam Brownback signed SB 318 Friday. The bill suspends “all state agency activities, studies, and investigations that are in furtherance of the preparation” of the plans that states are supposed to submit to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency as part of the Clean Power Plan.
9 May 2016

Senate moves to block Clean Power Plan study

The Kansas Senate advanced a bill that blocks the Kansas Corporation Commission from spending any money to study how to comply with the new federal Clean Power Plan until the U.S. Supreme Court resolves a pending legal challenge. Sen. Rob Olson, R-Olathe, added that amendment onto a bill that calls for disbanding the Kansas Electric Transmission Authority, an agency that was established to coordinate construction of new transmission lines to move wind energy to urban markets.
11 Feb 2016

Kansas takes air out of wind power mandate

The renewable power mandate in Kansas, which helped vault the state to become one of the top six wind power producers in the country, may be about to become a victim of its own success. Gov. Sam Brownback is poised to sign a bill repealing the mandate and making it voluntary instead.
20 May 2015

Some Kansas environmental groups disappointed with clean energy compromise

The bill strikes the state's current requirement, known as a "renewable portfolio standard," or RPS, which requires electric utilities to produce at least 20 percent of their power from renewable resources by 2020 and replaces it with a voluntary "goal." It also reduces property tax exemptions for renewable energy projects to 10 years instead of the life of the project. 
18 May 2015

Westar moves ahead on wind amid debate

Brownback calls himself a strong supporter of wind energy because of its potential on the frequently gusty Plains, but he said in July that he’s open to phasing out the state’s rule because wind is no longer a fledgling industry in Kansas. He’s also called several times for the industry and opponents of the renewable-energy mandate to work out a compromise.
17 Dec 2014

Lawmakers to vote on altered renewable energy bill

The revised legislation keeps the current 10 percent requirement and allows the 15 percent requirement to run from 2016 to 2021. But after that, the RPS would sunset, explained Sen. Forrest Knox, R-Altoona ...Rep. Dennis Hedke, R-Wichita, chair of the House Energy and Environment Committee, accepted Knox’s offer.
2 May 2014

House rejects bill repealing Kansas' RPS energy mandate

Rep. Marc Rhoades, R-Newton, said continuation of the RPS in Kansas would eventually lead to a significant increase in the cost of electricity. "Forty percent increases to the electrical rates to your constituents," said Rhoades ..."Folks, be advised you vote this down people will be hearing about the fact that you allowed their rates to rise," Rhoades said.
27 Mar 2014

Senate panel advances bill to repeal renewable energy standards

[The RPS] is not needed anymore,” said Mike O’Neal, president of the Kansas Chamber of Commerce. “I’d make an argument that it never was needed.” The RPS statute requires that utility companies get 15 percent of their energy from renewable sources by 2015, and O’Neal said they’ve already reached that point. “Time to take the training wheels off. We don’t need the RPS anymore.”
20 Mar 2014

Battle over renewable energy ahead in legislative session

Demands from conservatives to jettison Kansas' renewable energy standards died down by halftime of the 2014 legislative session, but like the Kansas weather, that could change at any moment. Asked if the effort to repeal renewable energy goals was dead for 2014, Senate President Susan Wagle, R-Wichita, responded. "Oh no. The session is just starting."
1 Mar 2014

Utility companies lobby for lower solar reimbursement

Mark Schreiber, Westar’s executive director of government affairs, told legislators that under current law his company “is paying net-metered customers a retail price for a wholesale commodity” and that the 1-to-1 kilowatt credit doesn’t account for infrastructure costs like power plants and power lines.
5 Feb 2014
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