Articles filed under Impact on Wildlife from Indiana

US Wildlife looking at impact of accidental kills by wind farms

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is developing an environmental impact statement to evaluate the potential of issuing incidental take permits for protected bird and bat species if regional wind industry development grows. According to a news release by the service, the states within the plan are Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. It is called the Midwest Wind Energy Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan.
20 Jun 2015

Wind farm developer eyes bat community

"Animals at night fly right into them," Carter said. "Imagine them flying at night 300 to 400 feet off the ground so they don't bump into a tree. Now wind turbines are in their fly space." Which is why USFWS required NextEra to increase the cut-in speed to 7 meters per second, from a half hour before sunset to a half hour after sunrise starting on July 15 and ending on Oct. 1 of each year.
10 Mar 2013

Wind turbines' effect on environment; Turbines pump out energy but at a cost to wildlife

Wind energy seems like a win-win for the area, providing energy with low impact on the environment. But what happens to wildlife when wind turbines go up? Wind turbines produce enough clean energy to power hundreds of thousands of homes across the state. But Purdue University Associate Professor John Dunning said they could also pose a threat to animals that share the airspace.
26 Aug 2009

Pros, cons of wind power evaluated

Within the next few years, dozens of wind turbines could be erected in Randolph County ... Indianapolis attorney Christopher (Kit) Earle, of Bose McKinney & Evans, advised farmers attending the meeting that land lease payments were just one issue they should address in a contract with energy companies. Other issues include access roads to the wind turbine for construction, operation and maintenance; soil compaction; escalation of lease payments to take inflation into account during the 20- to 40-year life span of the wind farm; underground electrical cables and their impact on cultivation and drainage tiles; fixed payments versus royalties or percentage of revenues from a wind farm; negotiating as a group because of safety-in-numbers advantages; and decommissioning turbines when they are no longer useful.
18 Nov 2007

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Indiana&topic=Impact+on+Wildlife&type=Article
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