Library from Illinois

A wind farm could be coming to Southern Illinois. Why are environmentalists trying to stop it?

Opponents argue that the 600-foot-tall, 2,400-ton turbines would diminish the area’s natural beauty and harm sensitive geologic features that provide habitat to 16 endangered species, including bats and crustaceans that live in caves and underground streams. ...Opponents got a boost in October, when the Illinois Department of Natural Resources published a report, known as an Ecological Compliance Assessment Tool (EcoCAT), examining how natural areas and endangered species could be affected by the proposed wind farm. The agency made 19 recommendations. The first was for the developer to consider an alternate location.
7 Dec 2018

Dekalb County IL wind energy ordinance

Dekalb_wind_energy_ordinance_-_nov-2018_thumb The Dekalb County Board adopted a new wind energy ordinance in accordance with the recommendations of the county's Planning and Zoning Committee. The ordinance includes the following key standards: All turbines are to be situated at a distance not less than six (6) times the height of the WECS tower from all property lines, turbine towers are limited to 500-feet, no shadow flicker can extend onto neighboring non-participating properties, and turbines cannot produce sound that causes an exceedance of the preconstruction/operation background sound levels by more than 5 dBa. The resolution adopting the ordinance is provided below. The full ordinance can be accessed by clicking the link(s) on this page.
2 Dec 2018

DeKalb County approves tough wind ordinance

The new regulations are meant to protect neighbors from the noise and flickering lights others in the county have experienced with less-regulated wind farms. They include 3,000 foot setbacks from neighboring properties, no shadow flicker, and very low maximum noise levels.
22 Nov 2018

How a county election in rural Illinois became a referendum on wind energy

Ford County, about 90 minutes south of Chicago by car, has had a moratorium on new wind development since last fall, after opposition was raised to existing regulations calling for 1,000-foot setbacks from any primary building. The county board’s zoning committee held meetings seeking input and recommended setbacks of 2,250 feet from buildings. Now the zoning board of appeals is considering revisions to the regulations, and their recommendations will be passed on to the full county board, which can make further revisions.
5 Nov 2018

Wind ordinance changes set for Thursday vote

The zoning board has been tasked with reviewing a proposed ordinance drafted by the Ford County Board’s zoning committee that includes a proposal to increase the existing 1,000-foot setback between wind turbines and “primary structures” — such as homes — to 2,250 feet, or four times a turbine’s tip height, whichever is greater.
1 Nov 2018

Planning and Zoning Committee OKs wind ordinance recommendations

After hearing hours of related comment during two public hearings Sept. 24, Clark said he is recommending the turbine setback to stay at least six times the turbines’ height away from neighboring properties. He said a wind energy development company could work around those restrictions by proposing a wind farm with shorter turbines or seeking waivers from neighboring properties, according to the recommendation.
24 Oct 2018

Developer seeks extension of special-use permit for wind farm

The developers of a proposed wind farm in the Gibson City and Sibley areas in western Ford County are seeking to extend a special-use permit for the project that is due to expire next month. ...An extension of the special-use permit would give Apex Clean Energy three more years to apply for construction permits, which require payment of $5,000 per turbine, since a developer can only acquire building permits prior to a special-use permit’s expiration.
11 Oct 2018

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Illinois
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