Library filed under Energy Policy from Germany

German energy market a disaster, says EDF chief

Germany as a whole was a huge country which was doing very well, especially in the auto sector, said Henri Proglio, EDF’s chairman and chief executive. “But when it comes to energy they are in a disaster,” he told reporters in London. “The two major companies, Eon and RWE are under huge pressure. One is more or less dead, the other is in a very difficult situation.”
10 Oct 2014

End of the Wirtschaftswunder? Germany's sudden slowdown

In reality, economists and some government officials acknowledge, there are deeper reasons for the recent downturn. ...They start at home, where Chancellor Angela Merkel's abrupt exit from nuclear energy after the Fukushima disaster in Japan and aggressive push into renewables has unnerved German industry. A recent overhaul of the country's complex renewable energy law has done little to alleviate uncertainty over future policy or assuage fears about German energy competitiveness.
18 Aug 2014

Development and integration of renewable energy: Lessons learned from Germany

Germany_lessonslearned_final_071014_thumb This important paper prepared for the benefit of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and Finadvice’s European clients examine the risks and failures of Germany's national plan to rely on renewable energy. Portions of the executive summary and conclusions are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
1 Jul 2014

Dirty U.S. coal finds a home in Europe

Germany's decision to phase out of nuclear power after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan has also made it a significant buyer of U.S. coal, mostly because the commodity is so inexpensive. "Before the financial crisis, Europe was happy to favor the environment, but when the economy started not doing well, they weren't quite ready to accept the high power price."
6 May 2014

Germany's green dreams meet harsh reality

A vision for a greener future for the world seems very distant if you descend into the heart of one of Germany's largest coal mines. While researchers and officials are in Berlin preparing the next report from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the country's fossil fuel industry is as busy as ever.
12 Apr 2014

Germany's Green Elephant

Less than three years after Berlin embraced its new energy policy, a shifting global energy landscape is causing a rethink of the Energiewende inside and outside Germany. Foreign leaders, and plenty of pundits, blame the Energiewende for Europe's inability to answer Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Utilities, meanwhile, are bleeding money, slashing investments, and shutting down power plants.
26 Mar 2014

German energy push runs Into problems

Electricity prices in Germany are already among the highest in the world. The price of industrial electricity has risen about 37 percent since 2005, according to the Federation of German Industries. The price in the United States has fallen by 4 percent over about the same time. The rise in energy prices has already cost Germany $52 billion in net exports and could prove even more damaging if steps are not taken to keep prices in check.
20 Mar 2014

Germany’s energy policy is expensive, harmful and short-sighted

Germany is an example of how not to do green energy. Instead the solution is to research and develop better green energy technology. A study by some of the world’s top climate economists including three Nobel Laureates for the Copenhagen Consensus Center shows that subsidising existing renewables does so little good that for every euro spent, 97 cents are wasted. However, every euro spent on green innovation could avoid €11 in long-term damages from global warming.
16 Mar 2014

Assessing the extent of Germany’s energy dilemma

Germans pay the highest electricity prices in Europe. Residential electricity prices, including taxes, are 60% higher in Berlin than in London, and are 40% above the euro-zone average. Germany’s energy minister, Sigmar Gabriel, recently estimated that the push to renewables is costing Germans €24 billion euros per year in higher bills. Were this to continue, Germany risked facing a “dramatic deindustrialization,” he said.
13 Feb 2014

Germany plans to raze towns for brown coal and cheap energy

But in 2011, in the wake of the disaster at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi plant, the German government reversed course and put the nuclear plants back on the chopping block. That will leave a hole in the country's energy supply that renewables can't quickly fill, meaning fossil fuels will continue to be part of the German energy mix for a while longer. Since coal is the most greenhouse-gas-intensive fuel, coal's comeback could set back Germany's efforts to combat climate change. 
11 Feb 2014

North-south divide threatens Germany's renewable energy highway

Currently, public support for Energiewende is still high but the rising cost has become a growing concern, and last month the new energy minister, Sigmar Gabriel, vowed to cut subsidies for wind, solar and other renewables ...Unless the new government manages to reconcile national priorities with the dynamics of its federal system, the mood could quickly turn against Germany's green revolution.
7 Feb 2014
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