Library filed under Impact on Economy from Europe

Power prices go negative in Germany, a positive for energy users

The wholesale costs of power make up only about a fifth of the average household electricity bill in Germany. The rest is a stew of taxes, fees to finance renewable-energy investments and charges for use of the grid. That means their bills are lower than they otherwise would be, because power prices are sometimes negative, but utilities are not depositing money in customers’ bank accounts.
26 Dec 2017

Is the reputation of Scottish offshore wind on the line?

The document claims that ‘it has been widely assumed that the underlying costs of offshore wind are falling and that the CfD prices indicate a sudden paradigm for the technology’. Yet, the report points to statistical analysis of the data, covering 86 wind farms, which suggests that the capital cost of offshore wind (£/MWh installed) is not in actual fact falling, but actually rising as a consequence of companies moving into deeper and deeper waters.
10 Nov 2017

Denmark, a green energy leader, slows pace of its spending

“I think the criticism is over the top,” Lars Christian Lilleholt, Denmark’s energy minister, told the Politiken newspaper last month. He said the country still planned to invest 800 million krone, or $114 million, in green energy research in the coming year. “There is less money, but it is still a lot. And I sit in a government that must find a way for the Danish economy to make ends meet.”
6 Dec 2015

British Steel’s Green Death

Start with a suite of renewable-energy policies that keep ratcheting up electricity costs. The so-called renewables obligation, which requires utilities to buy a steadily increasing share of their power from trendy green sources such as solar and wind, is driving up wholesale power prices. So is the feed-in tariff, which forces utilities to pay a minimum rate for renewable electricity that’s higher than the cost of fossil-fuel-fired generation.
7 Oct 2015

Government faces multi-billion pound black hole in budget to pay for clean energy supplies - which could mean your electricity bill rises

Under the scheme, everyone – from a household who decided to put a solar panel on the roof to the developer of an offshore wind farm – was guaranteed a premium on top of the market price for electricity, to help encourage the development of renewables. ...due to a decline in the wholesale price of oil and gas, as well as higher than expected installation of home solar panels, this budget of £7.6bn per year has already been busted by more than 20 per cent.
16 Jul 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&topic=Impact+on+Economy
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