Library filed under Energy Policy from Europe

‘Mr Energiewende’ quits German government in protest at coalition deal

Baake, a Green Party politician whose appointment by then economy minister Sigmar Gabriel was a surprise at the time, criticised the new government’s energy and climate plans in a resignation letter ...The plans for the energy transition (Energiewende) in the new coalition agreement were a “bitter disappointment”, Baake wrote to incoming energy and economy minister Peter Altmaier.
4 Mar 2018

Control for Low Carbon Levies

Control_for_low_carbon_levies_web_thumb The United Kingdom has has  taken steps to reduce the financial burden of supporting renewable energy in the country. The Government introduced its new Low Carbon Levies (LCL) framework which was designed to control the cost of supporting low carbon electricity paid by consumers on their electric bills. The plan addresses the costs of the 'Contracts for Difference' (CFD), the 'Renewable Obligation' (RO) and the 'Feed in Tariff Scheme' (FiTs). The government asserted that it will monitor the total cost of these programs and, "Until the total burden of these costs is forecast to fall in real terms over a sustained period, the Control will not allow for new low carbon electricity levies to be introduced.  Based on the current forecast, ...this will rule out new levy spend until 2025." The portion of the Government document is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.  
23 Nov 2017

Germany’s Shift to Green Power Stalls, Despite Huge Investments

Germany has spent an estimated 189 billion euros, or about $222 billion, since 2000 on renewable energy subsidies. But emissions have been stuck at roughly 2009 levels, and rose last year, as coal-fired plants fill a void left by Germany’s decision to abandon nuclear power. That has raised questions — and anger — over a program meant to make the country’s power sector greener.
7 Oct 2017

Germany risks reputation with climate goals failure

Germany is jeopardizing its reputation as a global leader on climate action by missing its own 2020 greenhouse gas emissions-reduction target ...​By 2016, German emissions had fallen 28 percent compared to 1990. The German government has already admitted it's unlikely to meet the 2020 target, forecasting an emissions cut of 35 percent. But the new analysis suggests even this may be over-optimistic.
8 Sep 2017

The Scottish wind-power racket

Wind farm owners in Scotland are making out like bandits; Since 2010, we’ve paid £328m to wind farms not to generate - most of them in Scotland; Westminster must stop Holyrood from consenting new wind farms and extensions.
10 Aug 2017

Germany's long goodbye to coal despite Merkel's green push

Although well over 20 billion euros are spent each year to boost Germany's green energy sector, coal still accounts for 40 percent of energy generation, down just 10 points from 2000. To avoid disruption in the power and manufacturing sectors, coal imports and mines must keep running, say industry lobbies, despite the switch to fossil-free energy.
2 Aug 2017

Government 'preparing to scrap EU’s green energy targets after Brexit’

Former Environment Secretary and Tory MP Owen Paterson told The Daily Telegraph he would be “very happy” to see the back of the green energy directive. He added: “It's distorting the whole energy market. It's like the Sheriff of Nottingham – it transfers money from my poorest constituents to my wealthiest constituents who are putting up pointless wind turbines heavily subsidised.”
15 Apr 2017

Wind energy is not the answer to Ireland’s emission problem

The wind industry continues to operate a ruthless cloak-and-dagger, divide-and-conquer strategy. “Community gain funds” and payouts have resulted in disharmony and disagreement among neighbours, sometimes causing major family fallouts. Turbine construction is governed by out-dated planning guidelines ...which allow them just 500m from homes, sometimes resulting in devastating consequences for families. 
6 Mar 2017

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&topic=Energy+Policy
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