Library filed under Technology from Europe

Second wind?

Gordon Proven and his business development manager Johnnie Andringa have seen it all before: they were in the vanguard when the industry failed to take off in Scotland 15 years ago. Today, Scotland has a second chance at building a manufacturing sector in renewable energy, but a funding row could mean another false dawn .
26 Mar 2006

Windpower 'supergrid' could be built

IRISH wind farm operators Airtricity and Swiss engineering giant ABB have completed a study into creating a European 'supergrid' linking national grids to be powered from offshore wind farms. Such a grid - which would cost billions - would carry power to where it is needed.
17 Mar 2006

Clean Coal Technology and The Energy Review

Clean_coal_energy_review_thumb This report is based on data provided by the International Energy Agency, the Department of Trade & Industry, the Royal Academy of Engineering, Princeton University and a number of other respected sources. It sets out an agenda for Government in the short term and the long term, answering the key issues raised by the Government's current Energy Review related to power generation: the economy, the environment and security of supply.
1 Feb 2006

Wind Power - 'Variable' or 'Intermittent'? - A Problem Whatever the Word

A Research Into the Achilles' Heel of the Wind Industry. With a wealth of examples and references, Dr. Etherington enlightens us on the principal weakness of windfarms: their erratic, unpredictable production of electricity. A modern economy cannot afford blackouts, so wind power production must be backed up 24h a day by conventional power, which substantially reduces the C02 savings
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Annual Report: Capital Grant Scheme for Offshore Wind - Scroby Sands Wind offshore farm site

Capital_grant_scheme_for_offshore_wind_thumb The values in Table 2 are based on total availability and reflect the time that the turbines are available to operate. Hence, no allowance is made for the effects of grid outages or ‘weather days’ which could prevent access to turbines for repairs. The planned availability was exceeded for only one month and the availability across the site was below expectation especially during the autumn period. This was due almost entirely to problems with bearings in the gearbox as will be discussed in Operational Issues.
31 Dec 2005

Vestas plunges on downgrade

Shares in Vestas, the world's largest wind turbine manufacturer, plunged almost 14 per cent on Thursday as the Danish company downgraded its full-year forecast because of a severe shortage of key components, a sluggish output rate and budget overshoots in the US market.
28 Nov 2005

New energy storage facilities could take the wind out of the sails of the intermittency debate

If the wind isn't blowing at peak times, the argument goes, then the wind turbines are not contributing to the power in the grid. However, if wind farms could store all the power they generate at off-peak times, during the night for example, and then control the way and time it is released, it would not only enhance the revenue streams they could receive, but also remove the intermittency claims. Now, a Canadian energy management firm claims to be able to do just that. EPOD International has secured two pilot projects with wind power developers in Canada and the US to test their proprietary energy storage system, the EMT.
19 Nov 2005

Estonia halts expansion of ‘expensive’ windmills

TALLINN - Wind power has fallen out of Estonia’s favor in recent months, with the Economy Ministry deciding to limit support to wind-power producers and Parliament adopting amendments to the energy law that will give preference to other forms of renewable energy. Einari Kisel, head of the Ministry of Economy and Communications’ energy department, puts it bluntly: “We do not want to have too many wind mills,” he says. “The price of wind energy is expensive. The unstable production causes additional costs to other producers.”
16 Nov 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=8&topic=Technology
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