Library from Europe

Control for Low Carbon Levies

Control_for_low_carbon_levies_web_thumb The United Kingdom has has  taken steps to reduce the financial burden of supporting renewable energy in the country. The Government introduced its new Low Carbon Levies (LCL) framework which was designed to control the cost of supporting low carbon electricity paid by consumers on their electric bills. The plan addresses the costs of the 'Contracts for Difference' (CFD), the 'Renewable Obligation' (RO) and the 'Feed in Tariff Scheme' (FiTs). The government asserted that it will monitor the total cost of these programs and, "Until the total burden of these costs is forecast to fall in real terms over a sustained period, the Control will not allow for new low carbon electricity levies to be introduced.  Based on the current forecast, ...this will rule out new levy spend until 2025." The portion of the Government document is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.  
23 Nov 2017

Wind farm axed at Bullecourt battlefield

Families of diggers who fell one hundred years ago on the Bullecourt battlefield in France have forced an energy company to abandon plans to build a wind farm on the historic site. Engie has announced it will halt the development of the project in response to an Australian backlash.
20 Nov 2017

Campaigners’ joy over rejection of wind farm appeal

“In the Inspector’s report, it was recommended the Department for Communities and Local Government throw out the application as damage to the heritage aspects of the area would not be outweighed by the public benefits of the proposed development. The report also found that the benefits would not justify the disruption to the landscape of the area and views from Lincolnshire’s villages.
19 Nov 2017

Offshore wind strike prices: Behind the headlines

Offshorestrikeprice_thumb The new report prepared by economics professor Gordon Hughes, a former advisor to World Bank, Dr Capell Aris, a fellow of the IET, and Dr John Constable of the Global Warming Policy Forum, explains how the broad assumption that offshore wind prices are falling is not valid. Through a detailed statistical analysis of the data, covering 86 wind farms, the authors found that capital cost of offshore wind (£/MWh installed) is actually rising as a consequence of companies moving into deeper and deeper waters. The summary of the report is provided below. The full report can be downloaded from this page.
10 Nov 2017

Is the reputation of Scottish offshore wind on the line?

The document claims that ‘it has been widely assumed that the underlying costs of offshore wind are falling and that the CfD prices indicate a sudden paradigm for the technology’. Yet, the report points to statistical analysis of the data, covering 86 wind farms, which suggests that the capital cost of offshore wind (£/MWh installed) is not in actual fact falling, but actually rising as a consequence of companies moving into deeper and deeper waters.
10 Nov 2017

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=5
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