Library filed under Impact on Landscape from Europe

£500,000 a year - a pot of gold, or just a sweetener?

A NORTH Sutherland community stands to gain up to half a million pounds a year in community benefit from wind farms, it emerged this week. But the "pot of gold" has failed to impress some Strathy residents who this week angrily dismissed it as a sweetener, aimed at making them accept major changes to their local landscape. ...The power company wants to build a £90 million, 35-turbine development on the north side of Strathy and a follow-up 77-turbine development on the south side of the forest.
1 Nov 2007

Experts landscape approval for wind farm

Three different qualified professional landscape and visual assessors have reported on the proposed Crook Hill wind farm with the result of three different conclusions. The first conclusion is that the 12 turbine wind farm is acceptable since the "landscape and visual effects will be temporary and there would be no long term impacts"; the second conclusion was that no wind farm at this location would be acceptable; and the third conclusion was that a smaller wind farm at this location would be acceptable, shifting the balance to two to one in favour of a wind farm at the site. ...If two out of three landscape assessors agree the location is acceptable and the council rejects the application, it will be left up to an inspector at an inquiry to decide whether the scale of the Crook Hill wind farm is acceptable or not.
1 Nov 2007

Hethel wind farm plan thrown out

Campaigners who have fought plans for a windfarm at Hethel were celebrating yesterday after the proposals were thrown out. South Norfolk councillors turned down the planning application by green-energy firm Ecotricity for three 120m turbines at car manufacturer Lotus's test track on Tuesday night. ...Grounds for refusal were opposition by the Ministry of Defence and the visual impact on the countryside. The MoD objected to the scheme because it would cause "unacceptable interference" to the air-defence radar at RAF Trimingham.
1 Nov 2007

Study backs plan for wind farms despite widespread opposition

A REPORT into two proposed wind farms in Yorkshire and Lancashire has deemed the controversial schemes "acceptable" in landscape and visual terms. The proposed schemes for five 410ft high turbines on Todmorden Moor, Calderdale, and three turbines the same height at Reaps Moss, in Rossendale, have brought strong opposition. ..."The proposed wind farm would be a temporary feature that added a new chapter to the landscape's industrial history."
31 Oct 2007

Protester vow: "we'll stop giant wind farm"

Shocked residents are launching a campaign to stop the building of six giant wind turbines that would overlook Bodmin.Renewable energy company Ecotricity has proposals to erect the 330-feet high structures on land between Trebell Green and Resperry Cross, near Lanivet. People in the area claim the huge turbines would be visible for 40 miles and would dominate the local skyline. They say the turbines would be a blot on the landscape and are about to form an action group to fight the plans.
31 Oct 2007

Fury as 13 wind turbines approved

Thirteen giant wind turbines will soon be towering over valley homes and the Brecon Beacons National Park. Neath Port Talbot Council has approved controversial plans for a wind farm at Maesgwyn, between Banwen and Glynneath. ...There were 45 objections sent in by residents, and concerns were also raised at public meetings, as well as by ward councillors. The main source of grievance was the impact the turbines would have on the area's countryside, as well as on tourism.
31 Oct 2007

Tourists don't want turbines

IF you think it's a good idea to cheapen the shop window of the Northern Lakes, with the construction of nine 335ft steel wind turbines on Berrier Hill, adjacent to the Lake District National Park and overlooking Blencathra - ask yourself this; how many businesses, or agencies, do you think will use a photograph of the wind farm in their promotional literature? I suspect hardly any - because instinctively you, and they, know industrial wind turbines do not attract visitors or tourists to the Lakes.
29 Oct 2007

Winds of change?

NEIGHBOURS have reacted cautiously to plans for a giant 100-metre wind turbine that would change the Alderney skyline for generations to come. The structure - almost twice the height of Nelson's Column - would be less than 250 metres from residential streets and tower over family homes. ..."I don't see why it cannot be away from the site and the power carried in via cables. "One hundred metre windmills have no place in family neighbourhoods." Carol Dowland, whose Francis Avenue home borders the waterworks, said: "I'm quite in favour of green energy and if it will save money it must be a good idea. "But it all depends on whether or not it is an eyesore.
29 Oct 2007

Span you believe it?

Massive new wind turbines could be on the horizon for the North-east. The structures would literally be jumbo-sized - with blades as long as a 747 jet. And today planners warned the 500ft-plus structures were a "serious" threat to the look of the landscape. The new generation turbines are being developed in the US by General Electric. An Aberdeenshire Council spokesman said: "The development of this new generation of larger wind turbines is a serious source of concern for us, especially in relation to landscape and visual issues. ...Lorraine Bolsinger, vice-president of GE's ecoimagination division, said: "The economics of longer wind turbines are going to be pretty compelling. "If you can put them in places where they're not eyesores, it'll be a win-win situation." But Aberdeenshire Council reckons it could be hard to hide a 500ft turbine. ..."We as a local authority need to view this type of development positively, but the industry has a responsibility too - they can't keep on developing ever-bigger structures with little obvious indication that potential adverse impacts on the landscapes of project sites have been fully considered."
27 Oct 2007

Warning over windfarms' CO2 threat

The construction of windfarms could trigger the release of more carbon dioxide than the technology was created to reduce, according to an investigation into proposals for hundreds of giant turbines on the Western Isles. The warning has been highlighted by the Views of Scotland (VoS) pressure group which argues that developers routinely inflate their predictions of carbon savings and underestimate the effect of "aggressive construction techniques" associated with building turbines, particularly on peatland. ...Basing its audit on developers' construction data, VoS believes the windfarms would cause the emission of 500,000 tonnes of CO2 a year more than they might save. VoS chairman David Bruce said: "This paper illustrates the implications for every wind-power site proposed on peat, of which there are many in Scotland.
27 Oct 2007

Energy firm has high hopes for wind farm

With eight 78-metre high wind turbines, the Gotthard project would not only be the largest wind farm but also the highest in Switzerland, at 2,040-2,131 metres above sea level. ...However, obstacles remain before sails start turning in the Gotthard pass. The area first has to be rezoned by the local authorities before planning permission could be sought and granted. ...Plans for a wind farm on the Gotthard Pass are not new. A report on wind energy in Switzerland published by the state in 2004 said locating turbines in the Gotthard Pass would be "unthinkable".
24 Oct 2007

Unwilling saviours of the environment

I view with dismay how your counties of the South West are being ravaged by the desire of others for you to solve the world's climate change problems.I am not surprised that the wind farm development at Fullabrook Down in North Devon was passed. Cornwall has been an easy target for developers and now, with government blessing, the race is on to ruin Devon. ...One problem for our ministers, planners and inspectors is that unless they take the time to do independent research, the technical data they are presented with will have been supplied either directly by the British Wind Energy Association or an agency which gets it from the same source. While the public begins to wise up to wind power the Government still sees what it wants to.
23 Oct 2007

Unwilling saviours of the environment

I view with dismay how your counties of the South West are being ravaged by the desire of others for you to solve the world's climate change problems.I am not surprised that the wind farm development at Fullabrook Down in North Devon was passed. Cornwall has been an easy target for developers and now, with government blessing, the race is on to ruin Devon. ...One problem for our ministers, planners and inspectors is that unless they take the time to do independent research, the technical data they are presented with will have been supplied either directly by the British Wind Energy Association or an agency which gets it from the same source. While the public begins to wise up to wind power the Government still sees what it wants to.
23 Oct 2007

Turbines take over county

The so-called green benefits will not out-weigh the damage and destruction that this will bring to the area. What also saddens me is the fact that this isn't the only village that is under threat as we speak. It seems that wind farm developers will not be happy until every village from Carlisle to the Lakes is home to these things.
22 Oct 2007

U-turn plea over huge wind farm

A Devon council is calling on Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks to reverse a decision to allow a huge wind farm. Earlier this month Mr Wicks gave Devon Wind Power the go-ahead for a 22-turbine project at Fullabrook Down. ...Council leader Mike Harrison said the "landscape and people of North Devon have been sacrificed in the national interest". He added: "This is a classic example of the impact of centralised planning on a local community."
22 Oct 2007

Windfarm hopes to move forward

The company behind plans to build a wind farm off the north Norfolk coast says it hopes to have all the permissions it needs in place by the end of the year. But Scira Offshore Energy's plan to put around 88 turbines at Shreingham Shoal is still meeting opposition from locals. ...At a recent meeting of Plumstead Parish Council councillors said that ...they want to see an all cross country route that avoids all residential areas, takes into account areas of outstanding natural beauty and other environmental considerations.
21 Oct 2007

Wind farms spark fears for wildlife

The meeting heard Prof Peter Cobbold use the name, Clwyd power station, to describe to more than 200 local residents what is in store for their countryside between now and 2010. He also talked about the changes in local scenery, which he believes will come about if the asssembly plans to generate electricity from wind turbines continues. ..."The significant thing is that not one word was voiced to support wind energy. "If they are so great, why did no one turn up to say so? Nobody wants them; everybody knows they won't close down a single 'dirty' power station; and yet they are foisted on us by an uncaring Government that refuses to listen to us."
19 Oct 2007

More objections to wind turbines

FURTHER objections have been made to plans to build four giant wind turbines near Hemsby. The Broads Authority planning committee has joined Hemsby villagers and Ormesby St Margaret parish councillors in voicing its opposition to SLP Energy's scheme for the 125m high turbines. The objections came at its committee meeting last Friday amid concerns about the detrimental impact on the countryside, outweighing the Authority's need to promote green energy. ...the development would also affect the ecology of the area, with large bird and bat populations at the wind farm site in an area known as the Trinity Broads which is bordered by Hall Farm Fen to the north, an area of fen grazing stretching to Hemsby.
18 Oct 2007

Still time to stop wind farm plans

The Government's decision to approve a wind farm at Fullabrook will, if implemented, have woeful consequences, ripping the heart out of rural North Devon. Make no mistake, these planned turbines are giant industrial artifacts, each one reaching more than 120 yards into the sky, each monster higher than St Paul's cathedral, dominating the landscape, generating noise pollution. ...You can see the reasoning in Energy Minister Malcolm Wick's statement about 'tough' choices' to meet 'clean energy objectives'. Unfortunately, the net energy contribution from the massive investment will be minimal, and it will do little or nothing to halt climate change. The Government wanted to demonstrate its hard-nosed green credentials. It has unfortunately no appetite for the really difficult action which would make a difference, such as compelling existing homes as well as new homes to be adopt energy saving features, switching from road building to public transport and using tax to phase out out petrol and diesel vehicles.
17 Oct 2007

Campaign group opposes wind farm plan

A CAMPAIGN group which aims to protect common land has hit out at plans to build up to 24 wind turbines in East Lancashire. The Open Spaces Society said the project, designed for the moors between Hyndburn and Rossendale, would be a "menace on the landscape". ...Because the site is common land the company will need special permission for the site. Kate Ashbrook from the conservation group said: "Haslingden is a wonderful oasis among the Lancashire towns. Here the public have the right to walk and ride over every square inch of the common. "The wind turbines with their associated paraphernalia would be a gross intrusion on the landscape and will be highly visible from the common and from further afield."
17 Oct 2007

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=40&topic=Impact+on+Landscape
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