Library filed under Taxes & Subsidies from Europe

Scottish Renewables Funding Sparks A Row

Deputy First Minister Nicol Stephen announced some extra funding for green energy systems in Scotland's homes recently, during the launch of a SCHRI-funded water-sourced heat pump at New Lanark Heritage Site. The £3m over two years will go to the Scottish Community and Householder Renewables Initiative (SCHRI) to fund small-scale projects.
17 May 2006

Danish island touts clean energy, but reality sets in

SAMSOE, Denmark -- In the late 1990s, Denmark set out to turn this farming and summer-vacation island in the Kattegat Sea into a showcase for clean energy. The government dangled generous financial subsidies. A former environmental studies teacher, Soren Hermansen, was hired to persuade residents to invest in wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and giant straw-burning furnaces.
9 Feb 2006

Public subsidies spark criticism

WEST Devon and Torridge MP Geoffrey Cox has launched a probe into the amount of public money spent by the Government to subsidise companies who develop wind farms. Mr Cox's Parliamentary Questions will form part of the latest stage in his campaign in support of the thousands of local residents who object to the siting of two wind farms in his constituency.
19 Jan 2006

The winds of change are still too costly for E.ON

E.ON UK has delayed construction on two of its 100MW offshore wind farms, stating the schemes are not financially viable. This is a problem for the company, as it needs renewable power assets to meet its renewables obligation. For offshore wind as a whole this is a major blow, as it suggests that the renewables obligation is not providing enough of a subsidy to cover the economics of new farms.
12 Dec 2005

Estonia halts expansion of ‘expensive’ windmills

TALLINN - Wind power has fallen out of Estonia’s favor in recent months, with the Economy Ministry deciding to limit support to wind-power producers and Parliament adopting amendments to the energy law that will give preference to other forms of renewable energy. Einari Kisel, head of the Ministry of Economy and Communications’ energy department, puts it bluntly: “We do not want to have too many wind mills,” he says. “The price of wind energy is expensive. The unstable production causes additional costs to other producers.”
16 Nov 2005

Reduction in Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Estimating the Potential Contribution from Wind Power

Renewable_energy_foundation_thumb In the UK, the parallel objective is to generate 10% of the UK’s electricity from renewable sources by 2010. Renewable electricity has become synonymous with CO2 reduction. However, the relationship between renewables and CO2 reduction in the power generation sector does not appear to have been examined in detail, and the likelihood, scale, and cost of emissions abatement from renewables is very poorly understood. The purpose of this report is to analyse a wide range of technical literature that questions whether the renewables policy can achieve its goals of emissions reduction and power generation. To some, renewable energy has the simple and unanalysed virtue of being “green”. However, the reality of this quality is dependent on practical issues relating to electricity supply. ......In conclusion, it seems reasonable to ask why wind-power is the beneficiary of such extensive support if it not only fails to achieve the CO2 reductions required, but also causes cost increases in back-up, maintenance and transmission, while at the same time discouraging investment in clean, firm generation.
1 Dec 2004

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=23&topic=Taxes+%26+Subsidies
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