Articles filed under Energy Policy from Denmark

Germany risks reputation with climate goals failure

Germany is jeopardizing its reputation as a global leader on climate action by missing its own 2020 greenhouse gas emissions-reduction target ...​By 2016, German emissions had fallen 28 percent compared to 1990. The German government has already admitted it's unlikely to meet the 2020 target, forecasting an emissions cut of 35 percent. But the new analysis suggests even this may be over-optimistic.
8 Sep 2017

Denmark’s Wind-Subsidy Lesson

The economic costs of Europe’s green-energy religion keep mounting, and now its more devout disciples are starting to doubt the faith. Witness Denmark’s reconsideration of its plans to build new coastal wind farms that would add 350 megawatts of generating capacity.
16 Jun 2016

Wind on government support

It is not possible to lie to the people forever about whether wind turbines can compete on equal footing with other forms of energy when the reality is that wind power - for the first 40 years of development - and forever after, will require billions in direct and indirect support.
26 Apr 2016

Denmark looks to lower its climate goals

Saying that the previous government’s goal to reduce carbon emissions by 40 percent in 2020 compared to 1990 levels will be too expensive for Danish businesses, Climate Minister Lars Christian Lilleholt said on Wednesday that he will not push to meet the benchmark. Instead, Lilleholt said it is enough to stick to already-approved climate initiatives that the Danish Energy Agency (Energistyrelsen) estimates will result in a 37 percent carbon dioxide reduction. 
20 Aug 2015

As Germans block Danish wind, a new feud tests crisis-weary EU

In a growing spat that is undermining the European Union’s 150 billion euro ($160 billion) program to strengthen the bloc’s electricity links, leaders in Bavaria and other German regions are turning down wind power from the north. Their biggest objection is the aesthetics of it all: New transmission lines would have to be put up across centuries-old German towns to bring in more of the electricity.
10 Apr 2015

German green energy bluster running out of wind

At least one green energy developer recognizes that these stimulus subsidy programs have a record of doing more harm than good, and he isn't reluctant to say why. Patrick Jenevein, CEO of the Dallas-based Tang Energy Group, posted a Wall Street Journal article arguing that "the sequester offers Washington a rare opportunity to roll back misguided subsidies and maybe help reverse wind power's stalling momentum."
13 Aug 2013

Danish wind turbines can be harmful to the climate

Billion Investment in wind turbines and utilization of biomass is useless if the goal is to reduce CO2 emissions. At worst, it can paradoxically harm the climate, says the Economic Council - sages - in an analysis in Berlingske Politiko. The complicated relationship skyuldes EU quota system for CO2 emissions.
28 Nov 2012

The myth of Denmark as a corruption-free country

Corruption is defined as moral decay, and that is precisely what we are witnessing here. The fear that Denmark could lose jobs and the near religious obsession with wind power has made politicians deaf and blind to objections to wind as a source of energy, and led them to take part in the industry's fraud. The environmental and human impacts of what they are doing appear to have no effect on them.
16 Nov 2012

Gone with the wind

According to Connie Hedegaard, the European Union's commissioner for climate action, "People should believe that [wind power] is very, very cheap." In fact, this is a highly problematic claim. While wind energy is cheaper than other, more ineffective renewables, such as solar, tidal and ethanol, it is nowhere near competitive. If it were, we wouldn't have to keep spending significant sums to subsidize it.
19 Mar 2012

Wind Power: Bad news blows in from Denmark

Returning to Denmark, according to a short article by Torbjörn Isacson (2010), one of the largest windmill producers in the world, Vestas (of Denmark), has run into serious difficulties, and will be reducing its production. What I would like to believe is that the economics of windpower are on the way to being understood by highly educated persons in Denmark and the rest of Scandinavia, but this is only partially the case.
19 Aug 2010

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Denmark&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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