Articles from Connecticut

Flurry of power plant proposals offers hope

After years of warning that New England's electric grid was on the brink of having to impose Third World-style rolling blackouts, top power officials now cautiously predict the region may have enough power for the near future. Since February, thanks to recent policy changes, proposals for 21 new power plants that could deliver enough electricity for about 3 million homes have come before regional power grid administrators. Those include a $1.5 billion NRG Energy Inc. plan for multiple new generators in Connecticut and a single generator that would burn methane gas from a dump in Westminster, near Fitchburg. The Holyoke -based organization that runs the six-state power grid and wholesale markets, Independent System Operator New England, plans to discuss the projects in a two-day Boston conference starting today .
25 Sep 2006

Tower to test wind power at Sterling site

STERLING -- More than six months of testing have convinced Exeter Energy to take the next step in its plan to put electricity-producing windmills in Sterling. Ken Wycherley, chief executive officer of Exeter Energy, said the company will erect a tower 160 feet high this week to measure wind speeds and directions on land it is leasing from the town in the industrial park.
21 Aug 2006

Wood-burning plants gain power

``The problem we're having with all these wind farms is . . . they're proposing to put them in all the worst places," said Thomas W. French , assistant director of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. ``If they could do what the Russell Biomass plant did, which is to find a preexisting, historical industrial district, we'd be applauding them." As part of the ongoing state permitting process for the plant, French's division worked with its developers to reroute proposed power lines to reduce their impact on wildlife.
6 Aug 2006

Regional power plan fairness questioned

Maine's largest energy provider is forecasting record-breaking electricity use this summer, as well as a need for additional supply lines to feed an ever-increasing demand. But a solution planned by ISO New England -- which manages electricity distribution in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont -- is being met with skepticism by Maine officials, who question the proposal's need and fairness.
19 May 2006

Regional leaders discuss energy at governors, premiers conference

Lee also warned that renewable energy sources, though desirable, were not a "silver bullet" solution. "It does leave an environmental footprint," Lee said, noting that wind energy and solar energy take up large areas of land, making it difficult to find a place to put them, especially in densely populated parts of the world.
13 May 2006

The New England Council and the New England Energy Alliance Outline Support for Nuclear Power in New England

If New England's nuclear energy plants had to be replaced by other non-emitting sources of electricity to meet the RGGI goals, the region would be looking at large-scale wind projects, with weather-dependent output, spread over some 650,000 acres of land or water at a cost of more than $10 billion.
11 Apr 2006

`Hybrid' Power System Sought

The president of Connecticut Light & Power Co. urged lawmakers Tuesday to partially reverse the state's deregulation of the power industry, saying consumers will get better rates if his company is again allowed to run some of its own generating plants.
1 Mar 2006

MIT team analyzes wind energy potential in Northeast

There's more to determining the value of wind power than knowing which way the wind blows -- or even how hard. MIT researchers studying winds off the Northeast coast have found that estimating the potential environmental benefits from wind and other renewables requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of both renewable resources and conventional power generation. Data show that wind-energy facilities would generate far more electricity in winter, because that's when winds are strongest. But the need for electricity is greatest in summer, when air conditioners are going full blast.
21 Dec 2005

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