Library from Connecticut

Northeast grid rules could make or break clean energy

ISO New England’s draft plan aims to strike a middle ground. While the grid operator’s working proposal eliminates the automatic price floor for subsidized resources, a similar calculation should still “be applied in certain situations,” ISO New England explained in a presentation to stakeholders in September. “In June, when we launched the effort to remove the MOPR from the capacity market, we made clear that we will do so in a way that doesn’t jeopardize either power system reliability or competitive pricing in the capacity market,” Matt Kakley, senior communications specialist at ISO New England, said in an email.
23 Nov 2021

Residency, demographics, and movement patterns of North Atlantic right whales Eubalaena glacialis in an offshore wind energy development area in southern New England, USA

N045p251-compressed_thumb This important research sheds critical light on the habitat of the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale in relation to offshore wind lease areas. The abstract of the paper is provided below. The full paper can be downloaded from the document links on this page.
29 Jul 2021

Commercial fishermen say they are being ignored on wind power projects

But now that many of the species have rebounded and government regulators are increasing the amounts of fish they can land, the fishermen face a new threat: offshore wind power projects. Fishermen such as Joe Gilbert, who owns four scallop and fishing boats based at the Town Dock, say their concerns are being ignored by federal officials who are in the process of leasing massive tracts of ocean bottom off the Northeast coast to wind power companies. Some of those tracts of bottom also happen to be areas where fishing boats land their catches and transit.
22 May 2021

‘Tragedy of the Commons’ will be the fate of marine environment in Atlantic Wind Farms

The impact of readily approving Vineyard Wind I and any number of other lease applications, on the fisheries and the environment is patently obvious given the existing record. Fish will be killed or driven away; fisheries (squid, whiting, lobster and others) will potentially be significantly altered.  And the dotting of thousands of square miles of ocean with turbines set 1 mile apart will radically alter transit and navigation. And while there are laws and widely recognized standards for environmental protection in these thousands of square miles of ocean, there is no one who will claim “ownership” of these “commons”.  Not even RODA who took their money and climbed into their boat. The price.  A few sea scallop beds.  Are these their pieces of silver?
28 Apr 2021

Lamont vs. New London

The project to accommodate the offshore wind farm of two rich utilities, one foreign, started at $93 million, zoomed up to $157 million this time last year and is now more than $200 million and rising, the governor suggested, in what was almost an aside in the conversation. The state has agreed to cover all the cost overruns, which seem to be exploding, even before bids have been opened.
15 Jan 2021

New England business groups make case to suspend energy efficiency surcharges

The business groups argue that halting the surcharges would provide some rate relief to both commercial and residential customers at a time when many are having financial difficulties as a result of the COVID-19 shutdown. “We’re not looking to decimate these programs, but we are saying, ‘We’ve got to take a breather,’” said Doug Gablinske, executive director of the Energy Council of Rhode Island, which represents large energy users.
9 Jun 2020

In New York and New England, wind energy projects are “like siting landfills. Nobody wants them.”

The rural opposition has been so strong that earlier this year, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo added a provision, known as Article 23, to the state budget that effectively strips local communities of their ability to stop big renewable-energy projects from being built in their jurisdictions. ...New Englanders like the idea of wind energy they just don’t want any wind turbines in New England. So they are putting them in New York.
1 Jun 2020

Norfolk family fights 646-foot wind turbine, approved by state council without public hearing. It ‘will be looming over us.'

The new tower would be much closer to the Golds’ home than the existing two. BNE’s measurements showed the third turbine 1,027 feet from the family’s house, 321 feet from one of their property lines and 523 feet from another of their land’s borders. Julia Gold notes that both distances from the property lines are far below the minimum setback the 2014 wind regulations would require in the case of a new application. ...The third turbine "will be looming over us,” Julia Gold said. “It will take away our right to use our land.”
10 Apr 2020

New England fishing groups wary of rapid offshore wind development plans

Those types of disputes are “what we’re trying to avoid happening now,” said Annie Hawkins, executive director of the Responsible Offshore Development Alliance, or RODA. The coalition of fishing stakeholders aims to get the industry on the same page as researchers and wind developers across the region. “We’re trying to make sure fishermen are much more involved in the process from day one,” Hawkins said. She’d like to see more work across state lines to coordinate policy and research.
7 Apr 2020

Connecticut joins others in blasting regional power grid operator

“Connecticut is plagued with some of the highest energy costs in the nation, and families and businesses simply cannot afford these bloated contracts,” Tong said in a statement released Thursday. “Restoring competition to this broken system could save ratepayers millions of dollars while also opening doors to improved energy efficiency and use of renewable technologies. ISO-NE has evaded the competitive bidding process, and this practice needs to end.”
3 Feb 2020

CT offshore wind may face some rough seas

The state and its offshore-wind-loving neighbors all face a year-end expiration of a federal tax credit that helps finance these projects – the first major attempts in the U.S. But in Connecticut some problems – including at least one self-inflicted one – could mean forgoing that money.
27 Aug 2019

Report and recommendations for minimizing and mitigating environmental and commercial impacts of offshore wind facilities

Report_of_the_commission_on_environmental_standards_-_final_thumb The attached report by the Connecticut Commission on Environmental Standards provides recommendations to offshore wind developers in mitigating potential risks to the area's wildlife, fishing industry, and water navigation systems. The Commission urges developers to conduct assessments on potential impact areas and provide funding to offset economic and environmental losses.
13 Aug 2019

Commission meets to discuss offshore wind development

There are concerns about the impact offshore wind will have on the migratory pattern of birds and other wildlife like the Atlantic right whale. The members of the commission, which is comprised of scientists, environmental organizations, and DEEP staffers, will be tasked with facilitating public participation in the process and gathering information about best practices. 
14 Jun 2019

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Connecticut
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