Documents filed under Noise from Canada

Déja vu and wind Turbines: A review of lived experiences after appeals of Ontario industrial-scale wind power facilities

Deja_vu_and_wind_turbines_-_wilson_krogh_peel_thumb This informative report validates the testimonies of homeowners that were filed in numerous appeals involving wind energy facilities approved for construction in Ontario Canada. The abstract of the report and an excerpt of the paper's discussion are provided below. The full report, which includes the list of the wind energy appeals by case number, can be accessed at the document links provided on this page.
15 May 2020

Preliminary Results: Exploring why some families living in proximity to wind turbine facilities contemplate vacating their homes—A Community-Based Study

Kroghetal2020_vacatedhomestudyfinal_thumb This important study from Canada shows the degree of impact on human health for those living within 550 meters of an operational wind turbine. The abstract and conclusions of the report are provided below. The full report can be accessed by selecting the document links on this page.
21 Feb 2020

Preliminary Results: Exploring why some families living in proximity to wind turbine facilities contemplate vacating their homes—A Community-Based Study

Kroghetal2020_vacatedhomestudyfinal_thumb This important study from Canada shows the degree of impact on human health for those living within 550 meters of an operational wind turbine. The abstract and conclusions of the report are provided below. The full report can be accessed by selecting the document links on this page.
21 Feb 2020

Wind turbine incident/complaint reports in Ontario, Canada: A review—why are they important?

Wind_turbine_incidentcomplaint_reports_in_ontario_thumb There were 4574 Incident Reports/Complaints regarding wind turbine operation received by Ontario’s hotline in the period from 2006-2016. More than 50% of the 3000 complaints received from 2006 to 2014 had no response from the government. Another 30% were noted as “deferred” response while only 1% of the reports received a priority response. This important report examines the incident reports and highlights the role of the reports in assessing public health concerns. 
18 Feb 2019

Health Canada’s Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study—A Review Exploring Research Challenges, Methods, Limitations and Uncertainties of Some of the Findings

396097169-health-canada-s-wind-turbine-noise-and-health-study-a-review-exploring-research-challenges-methods-limitations-and-uncertainties-of-some-of-the-find_thumb This important paper examines the highly touted Health Canada study that looked at wind turbine noise and its impact on human health. The authors cite serious limitations of the Health Canada methodology and the failure of Health Canada to honor its original intention of releasing the raw data for other researchers to confirm and test Health Canada's findings. Readers are encouraged to read this paper closely before accepting the reported findings of the Health Canada study.
20 Dec 2018

Riina I. Bray MD: Impacts of wind turbines on human health

Riina_bray_iwt_ontario-letter_thumb Dr. Riina Bray, the Medical Director of the Environmental Health Clinic at Women’s College Hospital, Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and former Chair of the Environmental Health Committee of the Ontario College of Family Physicians submitted this letter to the Premier of Ontario, The Honorable Doug Ford, addressing the health concerns related to wind turbines. The letter is provided below. The full letter including all references can be accessed at the links on this page.
28 Nov 2018

Using residential proximity to wind turbines as an alternative exposure measure to investigate the association between wind turbines and human health

Barry-etal-residential-proximity-wind-turbine-human-health-canada_thumb This important paper has found living close to wind turbines "is negatively correlated with self-rated environmental quality of life and physical health quality of life." The finding is consistent with other studies cited in the paper. The authors also found that turbine noise alone is not the only factor. Other factors may include "visual sight, vibrations, shadow flicker, sub-audible low frequency sound, or mechanisms that include individual subjective experiences and attitudes towards wind turbines." The results of the paper are posted below. The full report can be downloaded by clicking the links on this page.
6 Jun 2018

Status: Aramini-Krogh project to evaluate Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study

Stats_canada_health_canada_raw_data_project_update_july_2017_thumb In November 2014, Health Canada released the results of its $2.1 million “Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study.” Despite public anouncements from Health Canada that the raw data originating from the Study would be made available, the data continues to be inaccessible making it impossible to validate the conclusions drawn by Health Canada researchers. For example, HC found high levels of annoyance but concluded no association to turbine noise.
30 Jul 2017

Response to McCunney et al.: Wind turbines and health: An examination of a proposed case definition

Response_to_mccunney-wind_turbines_and_health_thumb  Dr. Robert Y McMurtry and Carmen M. E. Krogh published this response to commentary contained in the presentation of McCunney et al. McCunney et al. addressing wind turbine noise and the impacts on nearby residents. A portion of the response is provided below. The full response can be accessed by clicking the document links on this page.
16 Dec 2016

Open Letter - Industry compliance with Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA) and wind turbine investigation

Open_letter_prime_minister_trudeau__industrial_wind__turbines_june_14_2016__283a_29_thumb In this open letter, Barbara Ashbee of Mulmur, Ontario, together with hundreds of other Ontarians, sent an open letter to Health Minister Jane Philpott, asking why Health Canada has not insisted wind energy corporations report citizen complaints about noise radiation.The letter, attached here, asks the minister to meet with Ms. Ashbee and representatives of citizens suffering from turbine noise radiations. An excerpt of the letter is provided below. The full letter can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
15 Jun 2016

Open Letter - Industry compliance with Radiation Emitting Devices Act (REDA) and wind turbine investigation

Open_letter_prime_minister_trudeau__industrial_wind__turbines_june_14_2016__283a_29_thumb In this open letter, Barbara Ashbee of Mulmur, Ontario, together with hundreds of other Ontarians, sent an open letter to Health Minister Jane Philpott, asking why Health Canada has not insisted wind energy corporations report citizen complaints about noise radiation.The letter, attached here, asks the minister to meet with Ms. Ashbee and representatives of citizens suffering from turbine noise radiations. An excerpt of the letter is provided below. The full letter can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
15 Jun 2016

Letter: Listen to experts on turbine noise

Stephanieliumoeccletternov20noiseregreview_thumb Wind Concerns Ontario submitted these comments to the Green Energy Approvals section of the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC), following testimony from acoustics experts at the appeal of the White Pines wind power project. In the letter (provided below and attached to this page), WCO requests that the MOECC review the testimony of the witnesses, specifically that Ontario’s noise regulations are inadequate to protect health, and to apply the information to the current review of noise regulations for wind turbines underway in the province. The White Pines Wind Project, if built, will consist of 29 wind turbines with a nameplate capacity of 59.45 megawatts (MW) situated in within the ward of South Marysburgh and a small portion of Athol, Prince Edward County, Ontario. For more information pertaining to the White Pines wind application appeal before the Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal, see this website - https://appec.wordpress.com/ 
20 Nov 2015

Infrasound: Low frequency noise and industrial wind turbines

Infasound__and_wind_turbines_final_version_4_august_2015_thumb With the proliferation of recent research and the rediscovery of earlier, until now largely ignored studies, infrasound and low frequency noise (LFN) can no longer be dismissed as irrelevant. This report shows why LFN must be given full consideration as a contributing cause of the distress of some of those people living near wind turbine installations. It also demonstrates why the Ontario and Canadian governments must pay attention to this research. The table of contents for the report is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clciking the links on this page.
4 Aug 2015

Infrasound: Low frequency noise and industrial wind turbines

Infasound__and_wind_turbines_final_version_4_august_2015_thumb With the proliferation of recent research and the rediscovery of earlier, until now largely ignored studies, infrasound and low frequency noise (LFN) can no longer be dismissed as irrelevant. This report shows why LFN must be given full consideration as a contributing cause of the distress of some of those people living near wind turbine installations. It also demonstrates why the Ontario and Canadian governments must pay attention to this research. The table of contents for the report is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clciking the links on this page.
4 Aug 2015

Understanding the Evidence: Wind Turbine Noise

Cca-windturbinenoisefullreporten_thumb Health Canada asked the Council of Canadian Academies to conduct an in-depth expert panel assessment. The Panel’s report presents findings on the acoustic characteristics of wind turbine noise; evidence on causal relationships between exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse health effects; knowledge gaps and further research; and promising practices to reduce adverse community response. The resulting report is evidence-based and does not espouse recommendations. Its purpose, rather, is to assess the scientific evidence on the question of wind turbine noise and human health in order to provide a foundation of knowledge to support governments, policy-makers, communities, and the industry. A brief summary of the study is provided below. The full report can be accessed at the links on this page.
9 Apr 2015

Wind victim in Ontario says: Council of Canadian Academies should go further - an open letter

Vow_april_2015_letter__cca_v8_gsl_thumb Virginia Stewart Love, a member of Victims of Wind in Ontario, published this open letter in response to the recently released literature review by the Canadian Council of Academies CCA which found that annoyance can be caused by wind turbine noise – a clear adverse health effect. Ms. Love's full letter is posted below and can be accessed by clicking the link on this page.
9 Apr 2015

Wind victim in Ontario says: Council of Canadian Academies should go further - an open letter

Vow_april_2015_letter__cca_v8_gsl_thumb Virginia Stewart Love, a member of Victims of Wind in Ontario, published this open letter in response to the recently released literature review by the Canadian Council of Academies CCA which found that annoyance can be caused by wind turbine noise – a clear adverse health effect. Ms. Love's full letter is posted below and can be accessed by clicking the link on this page.
9 Apr 2015

Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects

Turbinesandadversehealtheffects_thumb Canadian health professionals Roy D. Jeffery, MD, Carmen M.E. Krogh, BScPharm, and Brett Horner, BA, published this peer reviewed paper which examines current literature on the impact of wind turbine noise emissions and the impact on residents nearby. The introduction and conclusions of the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking on the links on the page.
11 Jan 2014

Wind turbine sound prediction - the consequence of getting it wrong

Pma040066_palmer_thumb Wind turbines are rapidly increasing in number. In this paper, the example of the province of Ontario, Canada will be used. The Global Wind Energy Council tracks the world wide installed wind turbines, showing a 10-fold increase in the 10 years from 2001 to 2011 to nearly 240,000 MW. In Ontario the wind turbine capacity has increased over one hundred-fold from about 15 MW in 2003 to about 1700 MW at the end of 2012, and anticipates to continue to more than triple the total wind capacity to 5811 MW by 2015. Health Canada has a study underway on the health effects of wind turbines that will not report before this increase in wind turbine capacity is made. This paper will look at the basis for regulation of the installed wind turbine base in Ontario and investigates consequences of the installations identified already.
1 Jun 2013

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Canada&topic=Noise&type=Document
back to top