Library filed under Energy Policy from Canada

Green energy forcing ratepayers into the red

From Germany to Spain and Ontario to British Columbia, taxpayers are waking up to the fact that their power bills are going straight up. A major reason? Poorly thought out - some would say hopelessly naive - energy policies that encouraged an explosion of highly subsidized solar, wind, biomass and hydro projects, all in the name of saving the planet from evil fossil fuels. ...in some cases, these policies have led to an increase in carbon emissions.
16 Sep 2013

Wind Failure

Once the darling of the energy world, CBC News reporter Robert Jones reports that wind turbines in New Brunswick are expensive, unreliable and failing to meet production targets every year since coming online in the years 2008 to 2012. Duration: 1 minute 57 seconds
26 Jul 2013

Wind power falls short of targets

Production problems aren't new. NB Power documents show the utility has failed to receive expected amounts of wind power every year since the first turbines came online in 2008 and now routinely budgets to receive less from the farms than they are supposed to produce. ...Currently, New Brunswick has 113 commercial windmills grouped in three separate locations, all of them installed between 2008 and 2010.
24 Jul 2013

Energy Minister Chiarelli spins wind message

Martine Holmsen, manager of communications for IESO, said wind power would make its biggest contribution to the grid during winter and the shoulder seasons. But on Thursday morning (demand and generation vary hour to hour) wind at 62 megawatts (MW) was producing 0.26% of demand of 23,210.
19 Jul 2013

Legal challenge prompts West Grey to rewrite fee bylaw

The fees range from posting $100,000 performance bond for each turbine during the 20 year projected life of the machines, to $50,000 deposit for a peer review of reports generated in the renewable energy application process. Other security deposits include $50,000 for use of a municipal roadway by heavy equipment during installation and maintenance of the turbines.
9 Jul 2013

Wynne's wind fiasco; Website explains the real story of electricity generation in Ontario

Because wind is so inefficient, the only way to make it economically viable is to do what the Liberals have done. They're forcing us to pay inflated prices for it on our hydro bills, for 20 years, and forcing us to buy wind power first, even though we don't need it, because Ontario has an energy surplus, due to its beleaguered manufacturing sector. This means we dump less expensive (and "green") hydro power, for example, or sell it at a loss to Quebec or the U.S., to pay for wind.
6 Jul 2013

McGuinty's green-energy ‘vision' begins to fade

With the bulk of Ontario's baseload electricity capacity coming from emissions-free nuclear power, commissioning massive amounts of wind and solar energy at guaranteed sky-high rates was a dubious idea from the get-go. With energy surpluses galore, idling nuclear reactors so an overloaded electricity grid can accommodate intermittently produced renewable energy is costing Ontario dearly as it exports unneeded wind power at a fraction of what it pays for it.
27 Jun 2013

Just call them the Fiberals

Anxious to put a good face on their climb down on green energy, the Liberals touted a so-called $24 per year saving on the average hydro bill as a result of the fact they will now be spending $3.7 billion less of our money on green energy. Your hydro rate isn't going to drop by $24 compared to what it is now. All it means is that, theoretically, going forward, your bill will be $24 less than the even higher number it would have been under the original Samsung deal.
23 Jun 2013

Ontario slashes green energy deal

The province's change of heart is partly a response to the backlash over that arrangement - which made electricity bills more expensive ...It is also the latest sign of turbulence in the green-energy industry after the global recession reduced the need for power and an uncertain economy made less costly conventional electricity more attractive than pricey renewables.
20 Jun 2013

Province blows off wind megawatt goal

While Manitoba's neighbours are building turbines like gangbusters, Manitoba's policy-makers are letting wind power breeze on by. The province is in the seventh year of an unofficial moratorium on turbines, part of a policy change that has quietly wafted in, replacing a pledge to build 1,000 megawatts of wind power by next year.
18 Jun 2013

New Energy: a bill for $ 8 billion

This is taking into account all these factors that arrive at a figure of 14.14 cents for the cost of a kilowatt-hour produced by the wind industry. This is the most expensive energy in all categories: two and a half times the price of that produced by the central Hydro-Quebec, which he estimated at 5.55 cents per kilowatt-hour.
17 Jun 2013

Too little, too late

Most worrying was that while promising to give municipalities more say over where turbines are constructed, that power won't be bestowed until hundreds, perhaps thousands, more industrial wind turbines are erected on Ontario's skyline. This is because projects already navigating the approvals process are unlikely to be subjected to the province's new process.
7 Jun 2013

Province announces overhaul of FIT program for renewable energy projects; Officials doubt new MOE process will help

"It remains to be seen just how, or if, this new direction will have any impact on Pattern and Samsung's project, which already has Feed-in-Tariff approval," Clarke said. "Going forward, if there will be a more inclusive process that engages municipalities, that's fine, but what does it mean for current projects?" ..."The devil will be in the details."
5 Jun 2013

Impact of bad choices for climate change mitigation

Cctc2013_alt1-1_palmer_thumb In the Ontario electricity generation sector, this paper shows that selection of an intermittent carbon free wind generator actually increases the carbon emissions by displacing other carbon free generators, nuclear and hydraulic, and requiring the operation of carbon emitting natural gas and even coal generators to provide support for when the intermittent wind generation routinely falls in output. The introduction and conclusion of this paper are shown below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking on the link(s) at the bottom of this page.
1 Jun 2013

The environmental impact of increasing wind penetrations in a thermally dependent electric system

Cctc2013_alt1-4_sopinka_thumb Alberta’s electricity grid is characterized as deregulated and thermally dependent with a growing number of wind power facilities. Using a model to simulate both the unit commitment and economic dispatch decisions of the system operator, the total net CO2 reductions that result from the addition of wind energy into a heavily fossil-fuel based grid are estimated, assuming that contingency reserves are provided by part-loaded natural-gas fired units. Increasing wind generation levels lead to increased CO2 levels from reserve energy production but total CO2 levels decline slightly.
1 Jun 2013

Ontario ends controversial FIT programme

Ontario is dropping its feed-in tariff (FIT) programme and will change its local content regulations for wind and solar farms following the World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling that they contravened international trade law. Energy minister Bob Chiarelli, announced on Thursday that the province will develop a competitive procurement process for renewable energy projects larger than 500kW in size.
31 May 2013

Corbella: To eat or heat? That's the EU's question

The green lobby in Europe is so strong that it has pushed EU politicians to oppose virtually every kind of reliable non-renewable energy. ..."Ordinary families and small and medium-sized businesses are essentially subsidizing the investments of green do-gooders," who can afford to install solar panels on their homes and their businesses. But what's really starting to cause citizens and policy-makers to question their green energy agenda, is that soaring energy costs are driving energy-intensive industries in Europe to move to the United States.
15 May 2013

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Canada&p=4&topic=Energy+Policy
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