Documents from Canada

Industrial Wind Turbines can Harm Humans

Health_canada_comments_sept_7_thumb These comments were submitted to Health Canada in reference to the design of the Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study and to inform the Health Canada study team and others about the serious harm that has occurred to a family exposed to an industrial wind energy project. The full report can accessed by clicking on the link at the bottom of this page.
6 Sep 2012

Open Letter Preliminary Submission: Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study

Krogh_bio_appendix_i_v2_thumb An Open Letter has been sent to the Prime Minister of Canada and the Minister of Health for Canada exposing numerous insufficient procedures and processes utilized in order for Health Canada to develop a national study into the known and acknowledged adverse health effects from industrial wind installations. The Health Canada study design as published on July 10, 2012 is expected to be concluded in 2014. Concerns are that the design is not crafted thoroughly enough and that the participants are not independent experts. This could produce unscientific results which will have global consequences. Carmen Krogh is one of the world's foremost independent researchers on health impacts of wind turbines and author of the attached letter.
5 Aug 2012

Ontario government memo acknowledges adverse impact of turbine noise

Foi_pgs_45-50_1__c_hall_5page_thumb This incriminating memorandum on wind turbine noise was prepared by the Ontario provincial government and obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. The memo was released by Wind Concerns Ontario's WINDYLEAKS campaign. The document, written in April 2010, shows that the McGuinty Liberals were well aware that noise from industrial wind turbines operating -- even in compliance with Ontario's wind turbine regulations -- were causing adverse effects on communities.
15 Aug 2011

Adverse health effects and industrial wind turbines

Summary_of_new_evidence_august_2011_final_thumb The siting of industrial wind turbines in Ontario has been based on predictive computer modelling. While there is ample evidence regarding adverse health effects, the conduct of human health studies to determine regulations for setbacks and noise levels that protect health is still lacking. The purpose of this document is to inform authorities and decision makers of new evidence, including articles published in peer reviewed scientific journals which advance knowledge on the topic of adverse health effects of industrial turbines.
1 Aug 2011

Ontario Review Tribunal: Turbines too close to residences can harm human health

Ontarioenvironmentalreviewcasesno10-121-122_thumb This important decision by the Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal examines evidence on whether the Suncor’s Kent Breeze Wind Farm project which was approved according to Ontario’s Ministry of the Environment Noise Guidelines for Wind Farms and Ontario Regulation 359/09 made under the Environmental Protection Act, will seriously harm humans living nearby. The overall conclusion of the Tribunal (provided below) makes clear that wind turbine facilities placed too close to residents can cause harm to human health. The full report can be accessed by clicking on the links at the bottom of this page.
18 Jul 2011

Environmental Review Tribunal Decision: Erickson v. Director Ministry of the Environment

Ontarioenvirotribunalreport_thumb Ontario's Environmental Review Tribunal ruled that the Appellants of Suncor’s Kent Breeze wind energy facility failed to show that the project, as approved, would cause serious harm to human health. However, the tribunal also found that the evidence demonstrated that there are risks and uncertainties associated with wind turbines which merit further research. In that regard, the Tribunal asserted that future debate should focus on the most appropriate standards rather than “yes or no” arguments about whether turbines can cause harm. The Tribunal’s 223-page ruling provides an in-depth look at the state of current wind farm science and policy. Pages of the decision are devoted to the testimony of each of the witnesses.
18 Jul 2011

Save The River Position on Industrial Wind Development within the St. Lawrence River Valley

Save_the_river_wind_moratorium_position_statement_080410_formatted_thumb The special nature of the place that we inhabit, including the importance of the habitat and flyway, when taken with the scale of the wind energy projects proposed, the lack of a process to assess cumulative review, and the initial indications of substantial impacts to birds and bats, all lead us to conclude that wind projects proposed for our area should not proceed further until the Wolfe Island Wind post-construction wildlife impact study is completed and a cumulative wildlife impact assessment involving the US and Canadian governments has occurred.
4 Aug 2010

Critique of Ontario Chief Medical Officer report “The Potential Health Impacts of Wind Turbines May 2010”

Cmoh_analysis_june_03_2010_1__thumb In the fall of 2009 Dr. Arlene King, Chief Medical Officer of Health for Ontario (CMOH), took on the task of investigating the issue of industrial wind turbines and potential adverse health effects. On May 20, 2010, the Chief Medical Officer of Health of Ontario (CMOH) issued “The Potential Health Impacts of Wind Turbines May 2010” (CMOH Review). In response, an analysis was conducted by The Society for Wind Vigilance of the CMOH Review. The executive summary of the report is provided below. The full report prepared by Society for Wind Vigilance can be accessed via the links below.
3 Jun 2010

Rejection of wind farm sought by Nor'Wester Mountain Escarpment Protection Committee

The below letter, written by the Nor'Wester Mountain Escarpment Protection Committee, requests the Ontario Ministers of Energy and Infrastructure and of the Environment to intervene and stop the approval of an industrial wind energy facility on the Nor'Wester Mountain Range and the Loch Lomond Watershed in the Thunder Bay Area.
3 May 2010

A rational framework for electricity policy

Frameworkelectrictypolicycarr_thumb Ontario needs to return to rational decision-making when it comes to ensuring that current strategies meet future power generation needs. Current policies, such as the promotion of wind power, reflect public concerns about global warming at the expense of securing a stable and economic energy future. If such publicly popular but economically unsound policies continue, the province’s prosperity will be seriously jeopardized. In this provocative paper, one of the world’s leading experts on electricity generation traces the history of electrical utilities in Ontario and why their continued existence is essential to providing power cheaply and efficiently. In fact, he urges continued promotion of utilities as the best way to ensure that Ontario’s carbon footprint is reduced while maintaining its economic well-being.
1 Apr 2010

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Canada&p=3&type=Document
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