Library filed under Impact on Bats from Canada

B.C. study to help bats survive wind farms

Bats may never find wind farms as friendly as belfries, but a three-month study in northeast British Columbia is designed to make the power-generating turbines at least somewhat less deadly. Monitoring devices installed by AltaGas at the site of the proposed Bear Mountain Wind Farm have been recording data on the population and migratory routes of bats in the area since July. In later stages of development, the research is intended to help how the company can make its turbines to more bat-friendly.
23 Sep 2008

Bats fatally battered by wind farm effects

Baerwald, whose team checks for carcasses under turbines at the Summerview wind farm near Pincher Creek, Alta., every morning, says bats are one of the unforeseen casualties in the rush to harness wind power. Several thousand of the tiny flying mammals are killed by the turbines each year across North America, with some farms much more deadly than others. Industry officials say they are determined to reduce the death toll but concede it is not going to be easy since so little is known about the nocturnal creatures. ...The researchers dissected 75 corpses and report that 90 per cent died form internal hemorrhaging consistent with "barotrauma," tissue damage caused by rapid or excessive change in air pressure near the rotor blades.
1 Sep 2008

What is killing the bats of Pincher Creek?

Bats are dying as they fly into low-pressure zones around wind turbines. The sudden low pressure causes the air in their lungs to expand and cause tissue damage, called barotrauma. Low-pressure area: most severe immediately out from the blades and decreases as it gets closer to the centre of the turbine. There is also a low-pressure area down the shaft.
26 Aug 2008

What is killing the bats of Pincher Creek?

Bats are dying as they fly into low-pressure zones around wind turbines. The sudden low pressure causes the air in their lungs to expand and cause tissue damage, called barotrauma. Low-pressure area: most severe immediately out from the blades and decreases as it gets closer to the centre of the turbine. There is also a low-pressure area down the shaft.
26 Aug 2008

Wind turbines to blame for bat deaths: study

Sudden air pressure changes around wind turbines is likely behind the large numbers of migratory bats found dead in southern Alberta, according to a new University of Calgary study. The two-year study found 90 per cent of the studied bats found dead below turbines near Pincher Creek suffered severe injuries to their respiratory systems consistent with a sudden drop in air pressure that occurs near the turbine blades.
25 Aug 2008

Wind farm consultant gets $10K more from county; '1 study leads to another'

County Council narrowly agreed Wednesday to spend another $10,000 on new studies to make sure internationally significant bird, bat and raptor populations aren't harmed by looming wind energy projects. However, some councillors complained that the Jones Consulting Group of Oakville, which is doing the county's wind energy planning study, should have anticipated the need for the additional research. "I'm just a little disappointed in the whole process," said Leamington Mayor John Adams. He said he thought it was clear from the start that protection of birds, bats and raptors was going to be the major issue in the planning study.
18 Oct 2007

Wind turbines are killers

Earlier this month, the National Academy of Science put forward some compelling evidence that industrial wind power has some serious flaws. Also, recent U.S. Congress hearings brought forth several expert testimonies that warn of a potential environmental disaster (birds, bats, etc.) due to poor siting of turbines and lack of accountability. There are gaping holes in the protection of wildlife, birds and bats in particular, from poorly sited, constructed and monitored wind turbines in both the U.S. and Canada.
24 May 2007

Why are wind turbines killing Alberta's bats?

University of Calgary researchers are trying to understand why hundreds of bats are dying each year in Pincher Creek, inexplicably drawn to wind turbines. Robert Barclay, a University of Calgary professor who heads up the bat study at the Summerview Wind Farm in Pincher Creek, Alta., believes bats may be attracted by the sound of turbines or simply don't use their sonar when they migrate.
8 Sep 2006

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Canada&p=183&topic=Impact+on+Bats
back to top