Library from Canada

Energy policy in Ontario - Ontario needs clean coal, it is as good as it gets."

Energy Probe's Tom Adams' presentation to the Ontario Energy Association Breakfast Series' "Energy Policy in Ontario: Some Perspectives on the Road Ahead," on March 8, showcased a debate between Tom Adams and Jack Gibbons of the Ontario Clean Air Alliance. Tom's presentation advanced the case for "clean coal" and state of the art coal technologies and appears in full below:
8 Mar 2006

Land claims behind wind project: Innu Nation

The head of the Innu Nation alleges that a proposed wind energy project near Churchill Falls is an attempt by the Métis to bolster their land claim in Labrador. Toronto-based Ventus Energy and the business arm of the Labrador Métis Nation want to build a $2.5-billion wind farm along the shores of the Smallwood Reservoir.
15 Feb 2006

Coal may be in vogue again

Alberta's Energy Minister Greg Melchin touts "clean coal" in Ontario, where it is a foreign concept filled with too much uncertainty, compared to the familiarity of nuclear, despite nuclear's poor track record in the province.
14 Feb 2006

International Experience With Implementing Wind Energy

Implementingwindenergy_thumb International Experience With Implementing Wind Energy examines the relative costs, advantages and disadvantages of wind generation. In addition, the report explores infrastructure issues, public attitudes toward wind development, and the various policy instruments used to support the development of wind energy in countries that are leaders in implementing wind energy.
1 Feb 2006

CanWEA Letter Detailing Wind Turbines' Energy Consumption

Letter_to_the_oeb_jan_06_thumb In times of low wind, or during maintenance, a wind turbine will consume a small amount of power to run computers, communications, hydraulics, yaw motors, heaters and radiator fans. When a turbine is generating, its power curve (or rated output) is net of power consumption, so it does not draw power from the grid at that time. Commercial scale wind turbines produce power 70-80% of the time, with output ranging from a small amount to the full rated capacity of the turbine. A typical wind turbine will produce 100 times more power than it consumes in a given month. Its consumption and peak load are very small. A 1.8 MW turbine may have peak load of 27kW, with a resting consumption of as low as 5 kW. Wind turbines are principally suppliers of power to the system, and any consumption is purely incidental. As such, wind turbines are not typical demand customers and should not be treated as other loads.
18 Jan 2006

Magenn Power announces distribution agreement

OTTAWA, ONTARIO, Jan 10, 2006 Magenn Power Inc. today announced a distribution agreement with Krystal Planet Corporation to market the Magenn Air Rotor System (MARS), an airborne tethered wind generator. This innovative new product will deliver up to 4 kW (kilowatts) of power at a cost per kWh (kilowatt-hour) potentially much lower than conventional wind turbines mounted on towers.
10 Jan 2006

Wind Power 2005 in Review, Outlook for 2006 and Beyond

North American wind power is expected to see a more than fourfold increase in wind power plants in operation by 2010. The US is expected to grow from just over 6,700 MW to over 28,000 MW by 2010. Starting from a lower base of nearly 450 MW in 2004, Canada's wind power base will grow even more quickly to over 6,200 MW by 2010. Editor's Note: This article highlights an optimistic view of wind energy growth largely driven by current and anticipated tax subsidies (e.g. production tax credits) and the creation of artificial markets (e.g. renewable portfolio standards). Both are the result of political polices that promote an energy source that is neither responsive to base load energy needs nor effective in reducing greenhouse gases.
6 Jan 2006
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