Library from Asia

Post-tsunami Japan sticking with nuclear power

The nation seems to be sticking with nuclear power, at least for now. Unlike Germany, which accelerated plans to phase out atomic energy after Fukushima, Japan shows no signs of doing so. In recent days, utilities began newly mandated earthquake and tsunami stress tests, a first step toward restarting reactors idled for maintenance.
10 Sep 2011

Japan pins hopes on green power laws, risks abound

"The bills are half-baked. The investment plan is there but financing is lacking ...There is risk that stocks of solar and wind power plants will build up but won't be utilized effectively," he added. That would not hurt new suppliers given a preset return for a preset period but possibly clinch economic growth by boosting electricity bills for the sake of un-connected new facilities.
22 Aug 2011

Mixed wind sector weighs on Chinese results

"We faced a difficult pricing environment in our primary wind power market, resulting in margin pressure and lower sales volume." Though China has been consistently installing wind, global markets have slowed due to financial concerns and turbulent regulatory environments.
17 Aug 2011

SERC inspecting wind farms after disconnections

SERC said on Wednesday that the inspections, which will run all month, will include wind farm safety management, operations, grid connections and the actual wind turbines. The move follows four massive incidents in Jiuquan, Gansu province, one of the most important wind power bases in China.
5 Aug 2011

Hold the accolades on China's ‘green leap forward'

China is not an obvious environmental leader. It is beleaguered by severe pollution and generates more carbon emissions than any other nation. Yet many have trumpeted it as an emerging "green giant" for its non-carbon-based energy production and its aggressive promises to cut carbon ...the facts do not support this "green" success story.
21 Apr 2011

Nuclear woes boost Japanese wind but supply remains limited

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is limiting generation from renewable plants (including wind) to 5% of their installed capacity. ...Hokkaido Electric Company [is] also capping wind farm contributions to 5% of their capacity. In addition, Arakawa acknowledged that "small [wind farms] across the country are disconnected" and that these are unlikely to rejoin the electricity network until the nuclear crisis is stabilized.
12 Apr 2011

Wind mill firm warns of financial woes as energy policy hangs

The company also warned that its income tax holiday and equipment warranties are nearing expiry and will thus mean added tax and maintenance costs that will have to be paid. Selling to the wholesale electricity spot market, meanwhile, will cause the financial profile of NorthWind to turn "dire" as power sells here for at a lower P3.74/kWh on average.
5 Apr 2011

CWEA predicts China wind slowdown

The annual growth rate of China's installed wind capacity is set to slow down, said Shi Pengfei, vice-president of China Wind Energy Association (CWEA). ...Now, the grid has become a bottleneck for the expansion of the Chinese wind power industry.
28 Mar 2011

Japan and energy: What's the alternative?

As exciting as alternatives may seem, the answer to Japan's future energy needs is likely to come from more traditional sources, according to Ivo Bozon, a leading energy analyst at McKinsey & Company. "It takes a long-term commitment to get the scale necessary in renewables to produce meaningful amounts of the power ...There are physical limits on renewable energy."
24 Mar 2011

Weak grid connections stalling China's wind energy growth

The problem has largely been caused by the recent rapid growth in wind energy in China coupled with the extensive power grid upgrades that are needed to transmit wind energy to consumers. ...China plans to get 15 per cent of its energy from non fossil fuels by 2020, with wind power expected to contribute two per cent and solar one per cent.
27 Feb 2011

Wind energy's dirty secret

While the Liberals insist it's all about clean energy, a recent article in a British newspaper shows wind turbines are anything but green. A story by Simon Parry and Ed Douglas in the Daily Mail, Jan. 29, describes a horrific toxic stew brewing in China as a result of our search for the great, green holy grail.
26 Feb 2011

In China, the true cost of Britain's clean, green wind power experiment: Pollution on a disastrous scale

The reality is that, as Britain flaunts its environmental credentials by speckling its coastlines and unspoiled moors and mountains with thousands of wind turbines, it is contributing to a vast man-made lake of poison in northern China. This is the deadly and sinister side of the massively profitable rare-earths industry that the ‘green' companies profiting from the demand for wind turbines would prefer you knew nothing about.
30 Jan 2011

Sinovel loses power and falls 10%

Chinese wind turbine maker Sinovel Wind Group Co slumped by nearly 10 percent in its Shanghai trading debut on concerns its stock is overpriced and that rising competition will slow its earnings growth. ..."And wind stocks are no longer that attractive to investors."
14 Jan 2011

Three wind turbine workers killed in Sinovel incident

Three workers have been killed while installing and testing a Sinovel wind turbine in northern China. ...The accident follows a recent announcement by China's National Energy Bureau (NEB) that it is launching an investigation into whether cost cutting has led to a fall in safety standards.
7 Jan 2011

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Asia&p=11
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