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Getting power to the people

There is yet another plan to get wind power to the people who need it. In testimony filed with the Public Utilities Commission on Wednesday, that group's director of transmission oversight backtracked on a previous plan he proposed. T. Brian Almon said the Panhandle Loop plan is still a bad idea, but sending power to the Dallas area via Oklahoma by the X Plan is not such a good idea either. "I believe that there exist at this time uncertainties related to how the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would react to a very large export from Texas and then import into Texas of power," he said.

There is yet another plan to get wind power to the people who need it.

In testimony filed with the Public Utilities Commission on Wednesday, that group's director of transmission oversight backtracked on a previous plan he proposed. T. Brian Almon said the Panhandle Loop plan is still a bad idea, but sending power to the Dallas area via Oklahoma by the X Plan is not such a good idea either.

"I believe that there exist at this time uncertainties related to how the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would react to a very large export from Texas and then import into Texas of power," he said.

The commission oversees interstate transmission of energy and exporting, then importing from the same state but between separate power grids has not been done before on a large scale.

The previous plan he suggested would send 3,150 megawatts of wind power out of the Panhandle and send 2,700 megawatts of that to the part of Texas covered by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas.
Not sending the power directly to ERCOT would make building wind farms less profitable, according to a previous statement from Pat Wood, chairman of the North American advisory board for wind developer Airtricity, a member of the... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

There is yet another plan to get wind power to the people who need it.

In testimony filed with the Public Utilities Commission on Wednesday, that group's director of transmission oversight backtracked on a previous plan he proposed. T. Brian Almon said the Panhandle Loop plan is still a bad idea, but sending power to the Dallas area via Oklahoma by the X Plan is not such a good idea either.

"I believe that there exist at this time uncertainties related to how the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would react to a very large export from Texas and then import into Texas of power," he said.

The commission oversees interstate transmission of energy and exporting, then importing from the same state but between separate power grids has not been done before on a large scale.

The previous plan he suggested would send 3,150 megawatts of wind power out of the Panhandle and send 2,700 megawatts of that to the part of Texas covered by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas.
Not sending the power directly to ERCOT would make building wind farms less profitable, according to a previous statement from Pat Wood, chairman of the North American advisory board for wind developer Airtricity, a member of the Panhandle Loop group.

The Panhandle Loop would come from ERCOT to West Texas, gather power from wind farms and coal and gas plants and take it back to ERCOT without tapping into existing transmission wires. It would require about 800 miles of new lines and would cost about $1.5 billion.

"This creates the possibility of (Southwestern Public Service) building duplicate lines to serve its needs because it could not use the ERCOT-connected lines," Almon said. "I conclude that this arrangement is wasteful and inefficient."

Representatives of the Panhandle Loop supporters could not be reached for comment.

The new alternative the PUC wants would send wind power from the northern Competitive Renewable Energy Zones to the Southwest Power Pool and wind power from the southern zones to ERCOT via lines to run from the Floyd and Briscoe counties area eastward.

The PUC estimates construction time for major lines like these to range from 48 to 57 months after it designates CREZs in July.

Xcel Energy would build much of the system that would send power to the SPP.

"It would be upgrades and possibly some new lines," said Wes Reeves, an Xcel spokesman. "We're pleased the PUC staff is still considering at least the western part of the X Plan."

The Xcel expansion would also allow importation of power during times of peak needs such as the summer. Supply is tight then, wind is intermittent and most of Xcel's power is generated by expensive natural gas.

"We can bring in power from the East where there's more cheap coal power," Reeves said.



Source: http://www.amarillo.com/sto...

JUN 8 2007
http://www.windaction.org/posts/9337-getting-power-to-the-people
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