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Transmission-line plan could benefit Idaho's nuclear lab

A Canadian company's plan to build electrical transmission lines might provide a way for Idaho National Laboratory to sell nuclear power someday, a lab spokesman says. TransCanada's NorthernLights project includes three electrical transmission lines in the Pacific Northwest by 2012, including two that would run through southeastern Idaho. The two high-voltage, direct-current lines — one from Montana, the other from Wyoming — would come together in southeastern Idaho and weave south to Las Vegas. They will carry energy from coal, wind power and other sources.

Two will run through southeastern region; another will cross northern part of state

A Canadian company's plan to build electrical transmission lines might provide a way for Idaho National Laboratory to sell nuclear power someday, a lab spokesman says.

TransCanada's NorthernLights project includes three electrical transmission lines in the Pacific Northwest by 2012, including two that would run through southeastern Idaho.

The two high-voltage, direct-current lines — one from Montana, the other from Wyoming — would come together in southeastern Idaho and weave south to Las Vegas. They will carry energy from coal, wind power and other sources.

"This project will provide electricity for fast-growing electricity markets in the southwestern U.S. with access to low-cost, environmentally attractive generation resources," said Shela Shapiro, of TransCanada, an energy company.

Each of the 3,000-megawatt lines through Idaho will run about 1,000 miles at a cost of $1.5 billion per line.

One line will pass near the Idaho National Laboratory. Lab officials are examining what opportunities the line could bring. The line would give the lab access to the Western electrical grid, said John Lindsay, director of... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Two will run through southeastern region; another will cross northern part of state

A Canadian company's plan to build electrical transmission lines might provide a way for Idaho National Laboratory to sell nuclear power someday, a lab spokesman says.

TransCanada's NorthernLights project includes three electrical transmission lines in the Pacific Northwest by 2012, including two that would run through southeastern Idaho.

The two high-voltage, direct-current lines — one from Montana, the other from Wyoming — would come together in southeastern Idaho and weave south to Las Vegas. They will carry energy from coal, wind power and other sources.

"This project will provide electricity for fast-growing electricity markets in the southwestern U.S. with access to low-cost, environmentally attractive generation resources," said Shela Shapiro, of TransCanada, an energy company.

Each of the 3,000-megawatt lines through Idaho will run about 1,000 miles at a cost of $1.5 billion per line.

One line will pass near the Idaho National Laboratory. Lab officials are examining what opportunities the line could bring. The line would give the lab access to the Western electrical grid, said John Lindsay, director of communications and public affairs.

INL researchers are working to develop the next-generation nuclear power plant. If a plant is built at the lab and INL can generate electricity, the lab could potentially sell that power via the NorthernLights line.

"This particular proposal could give us the opportunity to provide electrical energy and earn some revenue," Lindsay said.

Several things must fall in place for that to happen. The INL still needs the money — and the OK — to build the nuclear plant. Lindsay said that is still 15 or 20 years away.

In the meantime, he said, INL will act as an information source for the NorthernLights project team.

The governors of Idaho, Montana and Nevada recently signed a memorandum of understanding authorizing their states to work collectively in a coordinated siting and permitting process.

TransCanada completed a feasibility study in 2005 and is working on getting the project approved by various agencies and groups.

The third line will begin in Alberta, pass through a corner of far northern Idaho, and swing west to run through Washington, Oregon and Northern California. Shapiro said the company could begin construction by 2009 if all goes well. The company hopes the lines will be operational by 2012.

"We are excited about this project, and it is moving in the right direction," she said.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Source: http://www.idahostatesman.c...

NOV 1 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/5577-transmission-line-plan-could-benefit-idaho-s-nuclear-lab
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