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Wyoming official gives nod to Montana plan

The man charged with leading power line projects in Wyoming says Montana’s new plan to supply electricity to markets in the Southwest won’t compete with similar plans in Wyoming. In fact, he says, it might even help.

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP)

The man charged with leading power line projects in Wyoming says Montana’s new plan to supply electricity to markets in the Southwest won’t compete with similar plans in Wyoming. In fact, he says, it might even help.

“I wish them the best of luck,” said Steve Waddington, executive director of the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority.

“It’s always good to see supporting transmission initiatives, because we need significant transmission infrastructure in the West.”

On Monday, Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer announced plans by TransCanada to build one of the longest electricity transmission lines seen in the West in 40 years — running from the coal fields of Montana to the Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix markets, carrying electricity created by either wind power or synthetic gas derived from coal to meet clean energy requirements in the Southwest.

Wyoming is engaged in similar projects: The TransWest Express is a joint project between the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority and Arizona Public Service Co., Arizona’s largest utility. And earlier this year, state officials in Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California proposed the Frontier Line, which would carry power... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP)

The man charged with leading power line projects in Wyoming says Montana’s new plan to supply electricity to markets in the Southwest won’t compete with similar plans in Wyoming. In fact, he says, it might even help.

 “I wish them the best of luck,” said Steve Waddington, executive director of the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority.

“It’s always good to see supporting transmission initiatives, because we need significant transmission infrastructure in the West.”

On Monday, Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer announced plans by TransCanada to build one of the longest electricity transmission lines seen in the West in 40 years — running from the coal fields of Montana to the Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix markets, carrying electricity created by either wind power or synthetic gas derived from coal to meet clean energy requirements in the Southwest.

Wyoming is engaged in similar projects: The TransWest Express is a joint project between the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority and Arizona Public Service Co., Arizona’s largest utility. And earlier this year, state officials in Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California proposed the Frontier Line, which would carry power from energy-producing areas in the Rocky Mountains to fastgrowing communities in California and elsewhere. Waddington said none of those projects alone will serve the growing energy needs of the Southwest’s growing cities. That’s why he doesn’t see Montana’s proposal as competition.

“We need much stronger transmission corridors throughout the West — so much greater than any one transmission line can support,” he said. “So having more than one project concept in the mix and moving forward is what’s needed and is what’s welcomed.”


Source: http://www.havredailynews.c...

OCT 25 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/5442-wyoming-official-gives-nod-to-montana-plan
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