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Eagles in danger zone; Call for strategy on turbine risks

A right to information report, recently released by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, shows 59 eagles were estimated to die at the Cattle Hill Wind Farm in the state’s Central Highlands over the development’s first 25 years, based on the original proposal for a 100-turbine wind farm. Wind farm operator Goldwind Australia has since revised plans for a 48-turbine wind farm — 33 of which were completed last year.

Dozens of Tasmanian eagles are at risk of being killed by turbines at the site of a proposed large-scale wind farm over the next two decades, new documents show.

A right to information report, recently released by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, shows 59 eagles were estimated to die at the Cattle Hill Wind Farm in the state’s Central Highlands over the development’s first 25 years, based on the original proposal for a 100-turbine wind farm.

Wind farm operator Goldwind Australia has since revised plans for a 48-turbine wind farm — 33 of which were completed last year.

The report, exploring the culling of fallow deer on or near the site, shows an average annual mortality of 2.1 eagles.

It states that in the event that the average number of eagle deaths exceeds the number predicted, the operator would develop an Eagle Action and Offset Plan in conjunction with the Environment Protection Authority.

Goldwind last year announced a trial of IdentiFlight technology, aimed at stopping eagles colliding with the turbines. If an eagle’s speed and flight path... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Dozens of Tasmanian eagles are at risk of being killed by turbines at the site of a proposed large-scale wind farm over the next two decades, new documents show.

A right to information report, recently released by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, shows 59 eagles were estimated to die at the Cattle Hill Wind Farm in the state’s Central Highlands over the development’s first 25 years, based on the original proposal for a 100-turbine wind farm.

Wind farm operator Goldwind Australia has since revised plans for a 48-turbine wind farm — 33 of which were completed last year.

The report, exploring the culling of fallow deer on or near the site, shows an average annual mortality of 2.1 eagles.

It states that in the event that the average number of eagle deaths exceeds the number predicted, the operator would develop an Eagle Action and Offset Plan in conjunction with the Environment Protection Authority.

Goldwind last year announced a trial of IdentiFlight technology, aimed at stopping eagles colliding with the turbines. If an eagle’s speed and flight path indicate a risk of collision, a signal is sent to shut the turbine down.

Birdlife Tasmania convener Eric Woehler said the state couldn’t afford to see more wedge-tailed eagles killed — a species which has an estimated 350 breeding pairs in the wild.

“Clearly we need to recognise the need to transition to renewable energy, while coming up with harm minimisation strategies to recognise that wind farms pose a genuine risk to the continued survival of wedge-tailed eagles, in particular,” he said.

Greens environment spokeswoman Rosalie Woodruff said authorities should give more focus to the protection of wedge-tailed eagle populations, “including reducing the fatal impact of turbine strikes”.

She said management of mass deer culls was putting eagles — which are known for feeding on deer carcasses — at risk of strikes.

An EPA spokeswoman said a Cattle Hill Wind Farm environmental assessment was undertaken in 2010.

“Based on its final assessment, the EPA imposed multiple conditions on the wind farm in order to mitigate risk and reduce the impact on WTEs,” she said.

Goldwind was contacted for comment.


Source: https://www.themercury.com....

JUN 3 2020
http://www.windaction.org/posts/51324-eagles-in-danger-zone-call-for-strategy-on-turbine-risks
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