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Farmer’s concerns for the turbines in his backyard

The property belonging to Mr Johnson and his family will be one of three residential Waituna Rd properties to fall under the “shadow” of RES’ proposed $450 million Dulacca wind farm, with some of the closest turbines to be built just over two kilometres from his back door.

Dan Johnson on his property, two kilometres from where several of the turbines are currently planned to be built as part of RES' Dulacca Wind Farm project.

Third generation Dulacca farmer and father of five Dan Johnson has been carrying a weight on his shoulders for the past 18 months.

The property belonging to Mr Johnson and his family will be one of three residential Waituna Rd properties to fall under the “shadow” of RES’ proposed $450 million Dulacca wind farm, with some of the closest turbines to be built just over two kilometres from his back door.

“When we received the first letter about the project in the mailbox we thought nothing of it initially, you know, you get stuff in the mail about this and that all the time. But once talk started happening with other landholders we began to get an idea that this wind farm could be a reality,” Mr Johnson said.

“As the project grew legs and started to take off, we soon learnt eight of the turbines are going to be built on a neighbouring property just 2.1km from our home.

“With the turbines calculated on a northeasterly breeze (for a majority of the time) our home will fall under the direct shadow of the turbines’ noise and... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Dan Johnson on his property, two kilometres from where several of the turbines are currently planned to be built as part of RES' Dulacca Wind Farm project.

Third generation Dulacca farmer and father of five Dan Johnson has been carrying a weight on his shoulders for the past 18 months.

The property belonging to Mr Johnson and his family will be one of three residential Waituna Rd properties to fall under the “shadow” of RES’ proposed $450 million Dulacca wind farm, with some of the closest turbines to be built just over two kilometres from his back door.

“When we received the first letter about the project in the mailbox we thought nothing of it initially, you know, you get stuff in the mail about this and that all the time. But once talk started happening with other landholders we began to get an idea that this wind farm could be a reality,” Mr Johnson said.

“As the project grew legs and started to take off, we soon learnt eight of the turbines are going to be built on a neighbouring property just 2.1km from our home.

“With the turbines calculated on a northeasterly breeze (for a majority of the time) our home will fall under the direct shadow of the turbines’ noise and vibrations.”

The development of the 43, 250-metre tall turbine project is being led by RES, a leading developer of new wind, solar and energy storage projects within the Australian energy market and was given the green light by the State Government and granted development approval back in March this year.

RES Wind Development Team Manager Daniel Leahy assured News Corp the project and all 43 turbines were well within legal boundaries.

“The Queensland Wind Farm State Code Planning Guidelines specify a minimum distance buffer of 1.5km between wind turbines and non-associated neighbouring dwellings,” he said.

The World Health Organization recommends reducing noise levels produced by wind turbines below 45 dB “as wind turbine noise above this level is associated with adverse health effects”.

While experts have been on the fence for years as to whether exposure to wind turbines has the potential to cause side effects to humans or animals, Mr Johnson is concerned the full impacts of the turbines’ proximity to his home may not be properly discovered for decades, with preventive measures coming far too late.

“How do we really know what kind of impact living this close to something like a 250m turbine can have on our mental and physical health? Like most things, it will be a case of by the time we realise the full impact, it could be too late.”

With the project still in the pre-construction phase, RES is still securing secondary permits, including management plans and highway junction design approvals.

“Once these permits and approvals are secured the project will be in a position to attract finance and start construction,” Mr Leahy said.

RES is aiming to start building on the Dulacca wind farm project in the first half of 2020.


Source: https://www.pressreader.com...

NOV 7 2019
http://www.windaction.org/posts/50570-farmer-s-concerns-for-the-turbines-in-his-backyard
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