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More talk needed on who pays for costs of renewables

We're not opposed to new energies, just the notion that taxpayers - and, potentially, a huge pool of rate payers - must subsidize their viability. Congress needs a thorough debate on this issue as well as other attempts to implement green and global warming policy through federal regulatory agencies.

The national debate over renewable energies is shifting into another gear with a proposal to spread the cost of transmitting wind and solar power among consumers regardless of their individual benefit.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is mulling the plan that could bill residents in a number of states to help pay for billions of dollars in transmission lines for alternative energy sources from which they would receive little or no benefit.

There's an "if you build it, he will come" quality to the proposal, which backers say is needed to help make wind and solar power more viable - something tax breaks and other considerations haven't yet done. "If you can take the transmission costs and allocate them to a broader group of beneficiaries, it reduces the costs and promotes the offshore-wind industry," wind power lawyer Elias Farrah told Bloomberg News.

President Obama wants 25 percent of U.S. energy to come from renewables by 2025. Although the proposal is stalled in Congress, FERC is moving to set up the infrastructure. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., wants the commission to allocate costs in proportion to the actual benefit consumers receive and not "vague benefits... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The national debate over renewable energies is shifting into another gear with a proposal to spread the cost of transmitting wind and solar power among consumers regardless of their individual benefit.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is mulling the plan that could bill residents in a number of states to help pay for billions of dollars in transmission lines for alternative energy sources from which they would receive little or no benefit.

There's an "if you build it, he will come" quality to the proposal, which backers say is needed to help make wind and solar power more viable - something tax breaks and other considerations haven't yet done. "If you can take the transmission costs and allocate them to a broader group of beneficiaries, it reduces the costs and promotes the offshore-wind industry," wind power lawyer Elias Farrah told Bloomberg News.

President Obama wants 25 percent of U.S. energy to come from renewables by 2025. Although the proposal is stalled in Congress, FERC is moving to set up the infrastructure. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., wants the commission to allocate costs in proportion to the actual benefit consumers receive and not "vague benefits of reduced planetary carbon emissions," as The Wall Street Journal editorialized.

We're not opposed to new energies, just the notion that taxpayers - and, potentially, a huge pool of rate payers - must subsidize their viability. Congress needs a thorough debate on this issue as well as other attempts to implement green and global warming policy through federal regulatory agencies.


Source: http://newsok.com/more-talk...

NOV 10 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/28785-more-talk-needed-on-who-pays-for-costs-of-renewables
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