Article

State experts seeking input on energy choices

The goal, he said, is to make changes that will put New Jersey "ahead of the curve and make us more competitive in the future."

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Global warming could potentially raise sea levels and inundate New Jersey's coast by the end of the century, so state experts want ideas now on how to reduce climate-threatening emissions while ensuring that residents and industry have a steady supply of affordable energy.

"We have to work to mitigate the effect of global warming and we have to adapt," said Randall Solomon, executive director of the New Jersey Sustainable State Institute, a state-funded nonprofit which sponsored a conference on energy Tuesday.

The group has no illusions, however, that state efforts alone will halt the rising temperatures that many scientists believe are causing polar meltdowns.

"Even if New Jersey were to stop all emissions, global climate change would still occur," Solomon said.

The goal, he said, is to make changes that will put New Jersey "ahead of the curve and make us more competitive in the future."

The institute is now selecting which indicators should be monitored to assess how the state uses energy and how it is moving _ or failing to move _ toward energy sustainability. Indicators for monitoring include greenhouse gas... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Global warming could potentially raise sea levels and inundate New Jersey's coast by the end of the century, so state experts want ideas now on how to reduce climate-threatening emissions while ensuring that residents and industry have a steady supply of affordable energy.
 
"We have to work to mitigate the effect of global warming and we have to adapt," said Randall Solomon, executive director of the New Jersey Sustainable State Institute, a state-funded nonprofit which sponsored a conference on energy Tuesday.
 
The group has no illusions, however, that state efforts alone will halt the rising temperatures that many scientists believe are causing polar meltdowns.
 
"Even if New Jersey were to stop all emissions, global climate change would still occur," Solomon said.
 
The goal, he said, is to make changes that will put New Jersey "ahead of the curve and make us more competitive in the future."
 
The institute is now selecting which indicators should be monitored to assess how the state uses energy and how it is moving _ or failing to move _ toward energy sustainability. Indicators for monitoring include greenhouse gas emissions, number of miles driven, and workplace transportation options.
 
Those wishing to comment can contact the institute at its Web site _ http://www.njssi.org. It plans to issue its first report by early winter.
 
About 75 conference participants heard sobering projections of worldwide distress, including how a 2-foot rise in ocean levels would flood most areas in New Jersey along the Atlantic Ocean, Delaware River and Raritan Bay, as well as parts of the Meadowlands. Actual estimates of sea level changes range up to 3 feet by the year 2100.
 
"For a place like New Jersey, climate change may very well be the defining issue of the 21st century," said Rutgers professor Anthony Broccoli, director of the Center for Environmental Prediction.
 
Another speaker was Jeanne M. Fox, president of the state Board of Public Utilities, who said, "Through this project, we can begin to change the mind-set and culture."
 
The BPU, which regulates utilities, in April directed that 20 percent of the electricity used in the state by 2020 should come from renewable sources such as wind or solar power, but Fox said the project will ask whether that proportion is sufficient.




Source: http://www.newsday.com/news...

MAY 24 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2754-state-experts-seeking-input-on-energy-choices
back to top