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Experts to answer wind turbine questions at Q & A Thursday, Aug. 12

The massive blades on the University of Delaware’s Lewes wind turbine seem to generate new questions every time they turn. In response: the university is holding a question-and-answer session next month, when its wind-power experts will answer questions about the turbine and its purpose. College of Earth, Ocean and Environment Dean Nancy Targett will moderate the event.

The massive blades on the University of Delaware’s Lewes wind turbine seem to generate new questions every time they turn.

In response: the university is holding a question-and-answer session next month, when its wind-power experts will answer questions about the turbine and its purpose.

College of Earth, Ocean and Environment Dean Nancy Targett will moderate the event.

Professor Jeremy Firestone, a wind-energy expert, and David Strong, senior project manager for Sustainable Energy Developments Inc., will be on hand to answer questions about the 2-megawatt turbine. Firestone is a researcher in the university’s Center for Carbon-Free Integration, and Strong helped manage the turbine project for an Ontario, N.Y.-based community wind company that consulted with the university to determine it was feasible to place a wind turbine at the campus.

Targett spearheaded development of the turbine, which is supplying power to the Lewes campus and research data for the school’s wind experts. The turbine, built by Gamesa Inc., is being used to research wind resources in the area, as well as how turbine structures will hold up in a coastal environment.

Ron Ohrel, director of the Marine... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The massive blades on the University of Delaware’s Lewes wind turbine seem to generate new questions every time they turn. 

In response: the university is holding a question-and-answer session next month, when its wind-power experts will answer questions about the turbine and its purpose.

College of Earth, Ocean and Environment Dean Nancy Targett will moderate the event.

Professor Jeremy Firestone, a wind-energy expert, and David Strong, senior project manager for Sustainable Energy Developments Inc., will be on hand to answer questions about the 2-megawatt turbine. Firestone is a researcher in the university’s Center for Carbon-Free Integration, and Strong helped manage the turbine project for an Ontario, N.Y.-based community wind company that consulted with the university to determine it was feasible to place a wind turbine at the campus.

Targett spearheaded development of the turbine, which is supplying power to the Lewes campus and research data for the school’s wind experts. The turbine, built by Gamesa Inc., is being used to research wind resources in the area, as well as how turbine structures will hold up in a coastal environment.

Ron Ohrel, director of the Marine Public Education Office at the University of Delaware, said the session is being held as part of the university’s commitment to solicit public input through the process of turbine construction. The turbine has already elicited complaints from Lewes residents, including Valarie Elliott. She said numerous studies show turbines should be located at least 2 kilometers, or 1.2 miles, from residents. She said she wants to know whether the City of Lewes or the university considered health when siting the turbine.

Firestone said there are several papers that say wind turbines can have a negative effect on health, but none of them are peer reviewed. He cited studies from health officials in Ontario and Australia and from the World Health Organization that find there is no published evidence that wind turbines cause health problems.

Firestone said that the concern centers around inaudible sound produced by the turbines, but health officials have not been able to confirm a link. He said the university’s wind turbine is situated a safe distance from residences and that an acoustic study commissioned by the university found sound levels 2,000 feet, or about 0.4 miles, from the structure are below 40 decibels. The state noise limit for residential areas is 55 decibels, he said. “We are interested in hearing people’s concerns and any questions they might have. We want to be good neighbors,” he said.

The University of Delaware is hosting a question-and-answer session about its Lewes campus wind turbine at 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 12, in Room 104 of the Cannon Lab. The event is open to the public. For details, visit www.ceoe.udel.edu/lewesturbine


Source: http://www.capegazette.com/...

JUL 31 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/27506-experts-to-answer-wind-turbine-questions-at-q-a-thursday-aug-12
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