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Cash needed to fund the winds of change

Mr Rigden, editor of ReNews newsletter, said offshore wind was likely to be “an industry for the next decade rather than this one”.

The race to be the first wind farm in the Greater Wash area has seen Sheringham overtake its next door rival Cromer.

But there remains concern that the government needs to plough more cash into wind energy to ensure schemes currently going through the planning pipeline end up getting built and turned into green electricity.

Between 45 and 108 turbines are earmarked for Sheringham Shoal in a scheme which is poised to be the first of eight Greater Wash projects.

Scira Offshore Energy, which is behind the scheme 17km off the coast, is poised to submit its environmental impact assessment to the government.

The aim is to build it by 2010, and provide enough home-grown energy for 178,000 homes - almost twice the power needed to supply the whole of the north Norfolk coast.

Scira spokeswoman Kerry-Leigh Bradfield said they were thrilled to be leading the way in the Greater Wash area, between Cromer and Scarborough.

The scheme would play a crucial role in meeting government targets to produce 10 per cent of the nation's electricity through renewable methods by 2010.

The company would be staging another... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The race to be the first wind farm in the Greater Wash area has seen Sheringham overtake its next door rival Cromer.
 
But there remains concern that the government needs to plough more cash into wind energy to ensure schemes currently going through the planning pipeline end up getting built and turned into green electricity.
 
Between 45 and 108 turbines are earmarked for Sheringham Shoal in a scheme which is poised to be the first of eight Greater Wash projects.
 
Scira Offshore Energy, which is behind the scheme 17km off the coast, is poised to submit its environmental impact assessment to the government.
 
The aim is to build it by 2010, and provide enough home-grown energy for 178,000 homes - almost twice the power needed to supply the whole of the north Norfolk coast.
 
Scira spokeswoman Kerry-Leigh Bradfield said they were thrilled to be leading the way in the Greater Wash area, between Cromer and Scarborough.
 
The scheme would play a crucial role in meeting government targets to produce 10 per cent of the nation's electricity through renewable methods by 2010.
 
The company would be staging another round of public exhibitions in June and hoped to get final permission in the next six months, having first won their license in 2003.
 
The number of turbines positioned 17km off the coast would not be finalised until later, because developing technology was constantly improving the output of the offshore generators.
 
It has, however, made more progress than a smaller 30-turbine scheme for Cromer launched in 2001, which hoped to switch on in 2005, sending power to 72,000 homes.
 
The Norfolk Offshore Wind scheme had some “technical problems” at what was always known to be a “challenging site” said Jonathan Levy, a spokesman for EDF energy. But he stressed last night the Cromer scheme had not been abandoned, and there was a commitment to the project, though the timetable had “moved on from the original one”.
 
Renewable energy expert Dan Rigden said only four of the 18 original wind farm plans had been built - because despite each project getting a £10m handout from the government, they still remained as expensive as nuclear power at the construction stage.
 
“North Norfolk is one of the strategic windfarm areas identified by the government, and there could be a building feast - but will they provide the necessary subsidy to get offshore wind power going?”
 
Mr Rigden, editor of ReNews newsletter, said offshore wind was likely to be “an industry for the next decade rather than this one”.


Source: http://new.edp24.co.uk/con...

MAY 20 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2709-cash-needed-to-fund-the-winds-of-change
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